Courses for Fall 2022

Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
EESC 1000-001 Introduction to Geology Reto Giere MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM An introduction to processes and forces that form the surface and the interior of the Earth. Topics include, changes in climate, the history of life, as well as earth resources and their uses. Physical World Sector
Quantitative Data Analysis
EESC 1000-201 Introduction to Geology Reto Giere M 1:45 PM-2:44 PM An introduction to processes and forces that form the surface and the interior of the Earth. Topics include, changes in climate, the history of life, as well as earth resources and their uses. Physical World Sector
Quantitative Data Analysis
EESC 1000-202 Introduction to Geology Reto Giere T 1:45 PM-2:44 PM An introduction to processes and forces that form the surface and the interior of the Earth. Topics include, changes in climate, the history of life, as well as earth resources and their uses. Quantitative Data Analysis
Physical World Sector
EESC 1000-203 Introduction to Geology Reto Giere T 3:30 PM-4:29 PM An introduction to processes and forces that form the surface and the interior of the Earth. Topics include, changes in climate, the history of life, as well as earth resources and their uses. Quantitative Data Analysis
Physical World Sector
EESC 1000-204 Introduction to Geology Reto Giere W 8:30 AM-9:29 AM An introduction to processes and forces that form the surface and the interior of the Earth. Topics include, changes in climate, the history of life, as well as earth resources and their uses. Physical World Sector
Quantitative Data Analysis
EESC 1000-205 Introduction to Geology Reto Giere W 1:45 PM-2:44 PM An introduction to processes and forces that form the surface and the interior of the Earth. Topics include, changes in climate, the history of life, as well as earth resources and their uses. Physical World Sector
Quantitative Data Analysis
EESC 1000-206 Introduction to Geology Reto Giere R 3:30 PM-4:29 PM An introduction to processes and forces that form the surface and the interior of the Earth. Topics include, changes in climate, the history of life, as well as earth resources and their uses. Physical World Sector
Quantitative Data Analysis
EESC 1000-207 Introduction to Geology Reto Giere F 8:30 AM-9:29 AM An introduction to processes and forces that form the surface and the interior of the Earth. Topics include, changes in climate, the history of life, as well as earth resources and their uses. Quantitative Data Analysis
Physical World Sector
EESC 1000-208 Introduction to Geology Reto Giere F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM An introduction to processes and forces that form the surface and the interior of the Earth. Topics include, changes in climate, the history of life, as well as earth resources and their uses. Quantitative Data Analysis
Physical World Sector
EESC 1000-601 Introduction to Geology Siobhan Whadcoat T 5:15 PM-8:14 PM An introduction to processes and forces that form the surface and the interior of the Earth. Topics include, changes in climate, the history of life, as well as earth resources and their uses. Quantitative Data Analysis
Physical World Sector
https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=EESC1000601
EESC 1060-001 Natural Disturbances and Disasters Siobhan Whadcoat MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Natural disasters play a fundamental role in shaping landscapes and structuring ecosystems. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to both the natural and social science of disasters. This course will explore the geologic processes that cause natural disasters, the ecological and social consequences of disasters, and the role of human behavior in disaster management and mitigation. Through exploring these concepts, this class will provide you with a broad background in the geosciences and the basic tools needed to understand: how earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, and hurricanes occur; the myriad of ways that we can mitigate against their impacts; and the way in which we can "calculate the cost" of these disasters. Quantitative Data Analysis
Natural Sciences & Mathematics Sector
https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=EESC1060001
EESC 1060-201 Natural Disturbances and Disasters Siobhan Whadcoat CANCELED Natural disasters play a fundamental role in shaping landscapes and structuring ecosystems. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to both the natural and social science of disasters. This course will explore the geologic processes that cause natural disasters, the ecological and social consequences of disasters, and the role of human behavior in disaster management and mitigation. Through exploring these concepts, this class will provide you with a broad background in the geosciences and the basic tools needed to understand: how earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, and hurricanes occur; the myriad of ways that we can mitigate against their impacts; and the way in which we can "calculate the cost" of these disasters. Natural Sciences & Mathematics Sector
Quantitative Data Analysis
EESC 1060-202 Natural Disturbances and Disasters Siobhan Whadcoat T 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Natural disasters play a fundamental role in shaping landscapes and structuring ecosystems. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to both the natural and social science of disasters. This course will explore the geologic processes that cause natural disasters, the ecological and social consequences of disasters, and the role of human behavior in disaster management and mitigation. Through exploring these concepts, this class will provide you with a broad background in the geosciences and the basic tools needed to understand: how earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, and hurricanes occur; the myriad of ways that we can mitigate against their impacts; and the way in which we can "calculate the cost" of these disasters. Quantitative Data Analysis
Natural Sciences & Mathematics Sector
EESC 1060-203 Natural Disturbances and Disasters Siobhan Whadcoat W 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Natural disasters play a fundamental role in shaping landscapes and structuring ecosystems. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to both the natural and social science of disasters. This course will explore the geologic processes that cause natural disasters, the ecological and social consequences of disasters, and the role of human behavior in disaster management and mitigation. Through exploring these concepts, this class will provide you with a broad background in the geosciences and the basic tools needed to understand: how earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, and hurricanes occur; the myriad of ways that we can mitigate against their impacts; and the way in which we can "calculate the cost" of these disasters. Natural Sciences & Mathematics Sector
Quantitative Data Analysis
EESC 1060-204 Natural Disturbances and Disasters Siobhan Whadcoat CANCELED Natural disasters play a fundamental role in shaping landscapes and structuring ecosystems. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to both the natural and social science of disasters. This course will explore the geologic processes that cause natural disasters, the ecological and social consequences of disasters, and the role of human behavior in disaster management and mitigation. Through exploring these concepts, this class will provide you with a broad background in the geosciences and the basic tools needed to understand: how earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, and hurricanes occur; the myriad of ways that we can mitigate against their impacts; and the way in which we can "calculate the cost" of these disasters. Quantitative Data Analysis
Natural Sciences & Mathematics Sector
EESC 1060-205 Natural Disturbances and Disasters Siobhan Whadcoat CANCELED Natural disasters play a fundamental role in shaping landscapes and structuring ecosystems. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to both the natural and social science of disasters. This course will explore the geologic processes that cause natural disasters, the ecological and social consequences of disasters, and the role of human behavior in disaster management and mitigation. Through exploring these concepts, this class will provide you with a broad background in the geosciences and the basic tools needed to understand: how earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, and hurricanes occur; the myriad of ways that we can mitigate against their impacts; and the way in which we can "calculate the cost" of these disasters. Quantitative Data Analysis
Natural Sciences & Mathematics Sector
EESC 1060-206 Natural Disturbances and Disasters Siobhan Whadcoat R 3:30 PM-4:29 PM Natural disasters play a fundamental role in shaping landscapes and structuring ecosystems. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to both the natural and social science of disasters. This course will explore the geologic processes that cause natural disasters, the ecological and social consequences of disasters, and the role of human behavior in disaster management and mitigation. Through exploring these concepts, this class will provide you with a broad background in the geosciences and the basic tools needed to understand: how earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, and hurricanes occur; the myriad of ways that we can mitigate against their impacts; and the way in which we can "calculate the cost" of these disasters. Quantitative Data Analysis
Natural Sciences & Mathematics Sector
EESC 1060-207 Natural Disturbances and Disasters Siobhan Whadcoat CANCELED Natural disasters play a fundamental role in shaping landscapes and structuring ecosystems. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to both the natural and social science of disasters. This course will explore the geologic processes that cause natural disasters, the ecological and social consequences of disasters, and the role of human behavior in disaster management and mitigation. Through exploring these concepts, this class will provide you with a broad background in the geosciences and the basic tools needed to understand: how earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, and hurricanes occur; the myriad of ways that we can mitigate against their impacts; and the way in which we can "calculate the cost" of these disasters. Quantitative Data Analysis
Natural Sciences & Mathematics Sector
EESC 1060-208 Natural Disturbances and Disasters Siobhan Whadcoat F 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Natural disasters play a fundamental role in shaping landscapes and structuring ecosystems. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to both the natural and social science of disasters. This course will explore the geologic processes that cause natural disasters, the ecological and social consequences of disasters, and the role of human behavior in disaster management and mitigation. Through exploring these concepts, this class will provide you with a broad background in the geosciences and the basic tools needed to understand: how earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, and hurricanes occur; the myriad of ways that we can mitigate against their impacts; and the way in which we can "calculate the cost" of these disasters. Quantitative Data Analysis
Natural Sciences & Mathematics Sector
EESC 1500-001 Paleontology TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Geologic history of invertebrates and their inferred life habits, paleoecology, and evolution. Introduction to paleobotany and vertebrate paleontology. Living World Sector
EESC 2300-001 Global Climate Change Irina Marinov TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Public perceptions and attitudes concerning the causes and importance of globalwarming have changed. Global Climate Change provides a sound theoretical understanding of global warming through an appreciation of the Earth's climate system and how and why this has changed through time. We will describe progress in understanding of the human and natural drivers of climate change, climate pr0cesses and attribution, and estimates of projected future climate change. We will assess scientific, tehnical, and socio-economic information relevant for the understanding of climate change, its potential impacts and options for adaptation and mitigation.
EESC 2600-401 Stratigraphy John G Ruck
Sophie M Silver
TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM Introductory sedimentary concepts, stratigraphic principles, depositional environments, and interpretation of the rock record in a paleoecological setting.
EESC 4320-401 Atmospheric Chemistry Joseph S Francisco TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM An introduction to the chemistry of the earth's atmosphere. Covers evolution of the earth's atmosphere, its physical and chemical structure, its natural chemical composition and oxidative properties, and human impacts, including photochemistry, and aerosols; stratospheric ozone loss, tropospheric pollution; climate change, and acidic deposition. Chemistry in the atmosphere of other planets in our solar system will be covered. EESC6320401
EESC 4336-401 Ocean-Atmosphere Dynamics and Implications for Future Climate Change Irina Marinov TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course covers the fundamentals of atmosphere and ocean dynamics, and aims to put these in the context of climate change in the 21st century. Large-scale atmospheric and oceanic circulation, the global energy balance, and the global energy balance, and the global hydrological cycle. We will introduce concepts of fluid dynamics and we will apply these to the vertical and horizontal motions in the atmosphere and ocean. Concepts covered include: hydrostatic law, buoyancy and convection, basic equations of fluid motions, Hadley and Ferrel cells in the atmosphere, thermohaline circulation, Sverdrup ocean flow, modes of climate variability (El-Nino, North Atlantic Oscillation, Southern Annular Mode). The course will incorporate student led discussions based on readings of the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report and recent literature on climate change. Aimed at undergraduate or graduate students who have no prior knowledge of meteorology or oceanography or training in fluid mechanics. Previous background in calculus and/or introductory physics is helpful. This is a general course which spans many subdisciplines (fluid mechanics, atmospheric science, oceanography, hydrology). EESC6336401, PHYS3314401
EESC 4336-402 Ocean-Atmosphere Dynamics and Implications for Future Climate Change Irina Marinov W 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course covers the fundamentals of atmosphere and ocean dynamics, and aims to put these in the context of climate change in the 21st century. Large-scale atmospheric and oceanic circulation, the global energy balance, and the global energy balance, and the global hydrological cycle. We will introduce concepts of fluid dynamics and we will apply these to the vertical and horizontal motions in the atmosphere and ocean. Concepts covered include: hydrostatic law, buoyancy and convection, basic equations of fluid motions, Hadley and Ferrel cells in the atmosphere, thermohaline circulation, Sverdrup ocean flow, modes of climate variability (El-Nino, North Atlantic Oscillation, Southern Annular Mode). The course will incorporate student led discussions based on readings of the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report and recent literature on climate change. Aimed at undergraduate or graduate students who have no prior knowledge of meteorology or oceanography or training in fluid mechanics. Previous background in calculus and/or introductory physics is helpful. This is a general course which spans many subdisciplines (fluid mechanics, atmospheric science, oceanography, hydrology). PHYS3314402
EESC 4440-401 Geomicrobiology Ileana Perez-Rodriguez TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Microorganisms inhabit almost every conceivable environment on the planet's surface, and extent the biosphere to depths of several kilometers into the crust. Significantly, the chemical reactivity and metabolic diversity displayed by microbial communities make them integral components of global elemental cycles, from mineral dissolution and precipitation reactions, to aqueous reduction-oxidation processes. In that regard, microorganisms have helped shape our planet overthe past 4 billion years and made it habitable for higher forms of life. In this course we will evaluate the geological consequences of microbial activities, by taking am interdisciplinary and "global" view of microbe-environment interactions. EESC6440401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=EESC4440401
EESC 4630-401 Hydrology Hugo Ulloa MW 8:30 AM-9:59 AM Introduction to the basic principles of the hydrologic cycle and water budgets, precipitation and infiltration, evaporation and transpiration, stream flow, hydrograph analysis (floods), subsurface and groundwater flow, well hydraulics, water quality, and frequency analysis. EESC6630401
EESC 4660-401 Soil Science Alain Plante MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Soil is considered the "skin of the Earth", with interfaces between the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. It is a mixture of minerals, organic matter, gases, liquids and a myriad of organisms that can support plant life. As such, soil is a natural body that exists as part of the environment. This course will examine the nature, properties, formation and environmental functions of soil. EESC5660401
EESC 4700-401 Remote Sensing Jane E Dmochowski TR 8:30 AM-9:59 AM This course will introduce students to the principles of remote sensing, characteristics of remote sensors, and remote sensing applications. Image acquisition, data collection in the electromagnetic spectrum, and data set manipulations for earth and environmental science applications will be emphasized. We will cover fundamental knowledge of the physics of remote sensing; aerial photographic techniques; multispectral, hyperperspectral, thermal, and other image analysis. Students will pursue an independent research project using remote sensing tools, and at the end of the semester should have a good understanding and the basic skills of remote sensing. EESC6700401
EESC 4997-001 Senior Thesis Jane E Dmochowski M 10:15 AM-11:14 AM The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
EESC 5200-690 Aqueous Geochemistry Maria-Antonia Andrews R 5:15 PM-8:14 PM This course is designed to provide the graduate student with an understanding of the fundamentals of aqueous geochemistry.The chemistry of water,air and soil will be studied from an environmental perspective.The nature, composition, structure, and properties of pollutants coupled with the major chemical mechanisms controlling the occurrence and mobility of chemicals in the environment will also be studied.Upon completion of this course, students should expect to have attained a broad understanding of and familiarity with aqueous geochemistry concepts applicable to the environmental field. Environmental issues that will becovered include acid deposition, toxic metal contamination, deforestation,and anthropogenic perturbed aspects of the earth's hydrosphere.
EESC 5600-401 Advanced Stratigraphy CANCELED Introductory sedimentary concepts, stratigraphic principles, depositional environments, and interpretation of the rock record in a paleoecological setting.
EESC 5630-695 Hydrology J. Anthony Sauder Introduction to the basic principles of the hydrologic cycle and water budgets, precipitation and infiltration, evaporation and transpiration, stream flow, hydrograph analysis (floods), subsurface and groundwater flow, well hydraulics, water quality, and frequency analysis.
EESC 5660-401 Advanced Soil Science Alain Plante MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Soil is considered the "skin of the Earth", with interfaces between the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. It is a mixture of minerals, organic matter, gases, liquids and a myriad of organisms that can support plant life. As such, soil is a natural body that exists as part of the environment. This course will examine the nature, properties, formation and environmental functions of soil. EESC4660401
EESC 5720-695 Environmental Due Diligence Mitch A Cron Evaluation of environmental contamination and liability is an important tool during acquisition of real estate property, and a standard work product in the environmental consulting field. This course will cover the purpose and history of the Superfund law, the various classifications of Superfund liable parties, and protections against Superfund liability, specifically with regard to bona fide prospective purchasers (BFPP). In the context of the BFPP liability defense the course will focus on the performance of "All Appropriate Inquiry" for the presence of environmental contamination (e.g. Phase I environmental site assessment). Our study of "All Appropriate Inquiry" will include evaluation of historical maps and other resources, aerial photography, chain-of-title documentation, and governmental database information pertaining to known contaminated sites in the area of select properties on or near campus. Site visits will be performed to gain experience and knowledge for the identification of recognized environmental conditions. Students will prepare environmental reports for select properties and will have an opportunity to hone technical writing skills.
EESC 6320-401 Advanced Atmospheric Chemistry Joseph S Francisco TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM An introduction to the chemistry of the earth's atmosphere. Covers evolution of the earth's atmosphere, its physical and chemical structure, its natural chemical composition and oxidative properties, and human impacts, including photochemistry, and aerosols; stratospheric ozone loss, tropospheric pollution; climate change, and acidic deposition. Chemistry in the atmosphere of other planets in our solar system will be covered. EESC4320401
EESC 6336-401 Advanced Ocean-Atmosphere Dynamics and Implications for Future Climate Change Irina Marinov TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course covers the fundamentals of atmosphere and ocean dynamics, and aims to put these in the context of climate change in the 21st century. Large-scale atmospheric and oceanic circulation, the global energy balance, and the global energy balance, and the global hydrological cycle. We will introduce concepts of fluid dynamics and we will apply these to the vertical and horizontal motions in the atmosphere and ocean. Concepts covered include: hydrostatic law, buoyancy and convection, basic equations of fluid motions, Hadley and Ferrel cells in the atmosphere, thermohaline circulation, Sverdrup ocean flow, modes of climate variability (El-Nino, North Atlantic Oscillation, Southern Annular Mode). The course will incorporate student led discussions based on readings of the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report and recent literature on climate change. Aimed at undergraduate or graduate students who have no prior knowledge of meteorology or oceanography or training in fluid mechanics. Previous background in calculus and/or introductory physics is helpful. This is a general course which spans many subdisciplines (fluid mechanics, atmospheric science, oceanography, hydrology). EESC4336401, PHYS3314401
EESC 6336-402 Advanced Ocean-Atmosphere Dynamics and Implications for Future Climate Change Irina Marinov W 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course covers the fundamentals of atmosphere and ocean dynamics, and aims to put these in the context of climate change in the 21st century. Large-scale atmospheric and oceanic circulation, the global energy balance, and the global energy balance, and the global hydrological cycle. We will introduce concepts of fluid dynamics and we will apply these to the vertical and horizontal motions in the atmosphere and ocean. Concepts covered include: hydrostatic law, buoyancy and convection, basic equations of fluid motions, Hadley and Ferrel cells in the atmosphere, thermohaline circulation, Sverdrup ocean flow, modes of climate variability (El-Nino, North Atlantic Oscillation, Southern Annular Mode). The course will incorporate student led discussions based on readings of the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report and recent literature on climate change. Aimed at undergraduate or graduate students who have no prior knowledge of meteorology or oceanography or training in fluid mechanics. Previous background in calculus and/or introductory physics is helpful. This is a general course which spans many subdisciplines (fluid mechanics, atmospheric science, oceanography, hydrology).
EESC 6440-401 Advanced Geomicrobiology Ileana Perez-Rodriguez TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Microorganisms inhabit almost every conceivable environment on the planet's surface, and extent the biosphere to depths of several kilometers into the crust. Significantly, the chemical reactivity and metabolic diversity displayed by microbial communities make them integral components of global elemental cycles, from mineral dissolution and precipitation reactions, to aqueous reduction-oxidation processes. In that regard, microorganisms have helped shape our planet overthe past 4 billion years and made it habitable for higher forms of life. In this course we will evaluate the geological consequences of microbial activities, by taking an interdisciplinary and "global" view of microbe-environment interactions. EESC4440401
EESC 6630-401 Advanced Hydrology Hugo Ulloa MW 8:30 AM-9:59 AM Introduction to the basic principles of the hydrologic cycle and water budgets, precipitation and infiltration, evaporation and transpiration, stream flow, hydrograph analysis (floods), subsurface and groundwater flow, well hydraulics, water quality, and frequency analysis. EESC4630401
EESC 6700-401 Advanced Remote Sensing Jane E Dmochowski TR 8:30 AM-9:59 AM This course will introduce students to the principles of remote sensing, characteristics of remote sensors, and remote sensing applications. Image acquisition, data collection in the electromagnetic spectrum, and data set manipulations for earth and environmental science applications will be emphasized. We will cover fundamental knowledge of the physics of remote sensing; aerial photographic techniques; multispectral, hyperperspectral, thermal, and other image analysis. Students will pursue an independent research project using remote sensing tools, and at the end of the semester should have a good understanding and the basic skills of remote sensing. EESC4700401
EESC 6770-695 Geocomputations Carl Mastropaolo Review and applications of selected methods from differential equations, advanced engineering mathematics and geostatistics to problems encountered in geology, engineering geology, geophysics and hydrology.
EESC 6810-690 Applied and Environmental Geophysics J. Anthony Sauder M 5:15 PM-8:14 PM The application of geophysical investigation techniques to problems of the local and shallow subsurface structure of the earth. The application of geophysical measurements and interpretation for environmental site characterizations, locating buried structures, groundwater investigations, and identifying geotechnical hazards with emphasis on gravity methods, seismic refraction and reflection, electrical resistivity, electromagnetic methods, ground penetrating radar, and borehole nuclear logging.
EESC 6820-690 Geomechanics: Solids George E Duda T 5:15 PM-8:14 PM Mechanical properties of solid and fluid earth materials, stress and strain, earth pressures in soil and rock, tunnels, piles, and piers; flow through gates, wiers, spillways and culverts, hydraulics, seepage and Darcy's law as applied to the hydrologic sciences.
EESC 6840-001 Engineering Geology: Rock Mechanics Chad H Freed W 5:15 PM-8:14 PM This course focuses on the rock mechanics aspects of Engineering Geology. The theme is characterization of the geologic environment for engineering and environmental investigations. Covered are the various exploration tools and methods, including: Collection and analysis of existing engineering data; Interpretation of remotely sensed imagery; Field and laboratory measurements of material properties; Measurement and characterization of rock discontinuities; Rock slope stability analysis; Stress, strain and failure of rocks and the importance of scale; Rock core logging; Rock mass rating; Rock support and reinforcement; Rock excavation, blasting and blast monitoring and control.
EESC 7911-301 Research Topics in Earth Science David Goldsby CANCELED This seminar will familiarize new PhD students in Earth Science with the skills and knowledge needed to develop as professionals. Topics will include research ethics, the publication process, writing proposal for research funding, etc.
EESC 7991-301 Topics in Earth Science Joseph S Francisco R 5:15 PM-8:14 PM This course will use the weekly EES seminar series to survey historic breakthrogh papers or topics in the earth sciences, as well as modern papers - written by the seminar speakers - that often put the classics in perspective. Graduate students (Ph.D. only) in the Department of Earth and Environmental Science will engage in the material through reading, presentation, and discussion. The course has several goals. (1.) To engender an understanding and appreciation of major breakthroughs in our field. (2.) To develop skills in presenting and discussing scientific results. And (3.) to refine students' understanding of what constitutes great science.
EESC 9900-990 Masters Thesis Yvette L Bordeaux While working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
EESC 9950-009 Dissertation Nicholas Crivaro
Joseph S Francisco
Reto Giere
Course for PhD students dissertation credit.
EESC 9950-011 Dissertation Nicholas Crivaro
Reto Giere
David Goldsby
Course for PhD students dissertation credit.
EESC 9950-034 Dissertation Nicholas Crivaro
Reto Giere
Ileana Perez-Rodriguez
Course for PhD students dissertation credit.
EESC 9950-035 Dissertation Lauren C Sallan Course for PhD students dissertation credit.
EESC 9950-036 Dissertation Nicholas Crivaro
Reto Giere
Course for PhD students dissertation credit.
EESC 9950-037 Dissertation Nicholas Crivaro
Reto Giere
Alain Plante
Course for PhD students dissertation credit.
EESC 9950-038 Dissertation Nicholas Crivaro
Reto Giere
Douglas J Jerolmack
Course for PhD students dissertation credit.
EESC 9950-045 Dissertation Nicholas Crivaro
Reto Giere
Irina Marinov
Course for PhD students dissertation credit.
ENVS 0053-401 Sustainable Development and Culture in Latin America Teresa Gimenez MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This interdisciplinary course exposes students to the three dimensions of sustainable development -environmental, economic, and social- through an examination of three products -peyote, coca, and coffee- that are crucial in shaping modern identity in areas of Latin America. The course integrates this analysis of sustainable development in relation to cultural sustainability and cultural practices associated with peyote, coca, and coffee and their rich, traditional heritage and place in literature, film, and the arts. ANTH0091401, LALS0091401, SPAN0091401 Cross Cultural Analysis Perm Needed From Instructor
ENVS 1050-401 Sustainability & Utopianism Bethany Wiggin TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This seminar explores how the humanities can contribute to discussions of sustainability. We begin by investigating the contested term itself, paying close attention to critics and activists who deplore the very idea that we should try to sustain our, in their eyes, dystopian present, one marked by environmental catastrophe as well as by an assault on the educational ideals long embodied in the humanities. We then turn to classic humanist texts on utopia, beginning with More's fictive island of 1517. The "origins of environmentalism" lie in such depictions of island edens (Richard Grove), and our course proceeds to analyze classic utopian tests from American, English, and German literatures. Readings extend to utopian visions from Europe and America of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, as well as literary and visual texts that deal with contemporary nuclear and flood catastrophes. Authors include: Bill McKibben, Jill Kerr Conway, Christopher Newfield, Thomas More, Francis Bacon, Karl Marx, Henry David Thoreau, Robert Owens, William Morris, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Ayn Rand, Christa Wolf, and others. COML1160401, ENGL1579401, GRMN1160401, STSC1160401 Humanties & Social Science Sector
ENVS 1410-401 Ecocritical Lit: Nature, Ecology and the Literary Imagination Barri Joyce Gold TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM “Nature is perhaps the most complex word in the language,” says Raymond Williams in his influential book Keywords. This course explores the many meanings of “nature” as well as the assumptions, anxieties, and aspirations attached to such terms as “environment,” “ecology,” “conservation,” “resource,” “climate,” and “sustainability.” This is not a course in environmental literature per se, but rather an exploration of how language and literature engages with and shapes our relations to and our understandings of the natural world. We will consider both the ways literature--especially the poetry and fiction of the nineteenth century--contributes to present ecology-breaking worldviews, as well as how reading and writing differently is a necessary part of the struggle to refigure our relationship to the natural world. ENGL1595401
ENVS 1615-301 Urban Environments: Speaking About Lead in West Philadelphia Maria-Antonia Andrews TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Lead poisoning can cause learning disabilities, impaired hearing, behavioral problems, and at very high levels, seizures, coma and even death. Children up to the age of six are especially at risk because of their developing systems; they often ingest lead chips and dust while playing in their home and yards. In ENVS 404, Penn undergraduates learn about the epidemiology of lead poisoning, the pathways of exposure, and methods for community outreach and education. Penn students collaborate with middle school and high school teachers in West Philadelphia to engage middle school children in exercises that apply environmental research relating to lead poisoning to their homes and neighborhoods. Natural Sciences & Mathematics Sector
ENVS 1650-301 The Role of Water in Urban Sustainability and Resiliency Howard Mark Neukrug M 5:15 PM-8:14 PM This course will provide an overview of the cross-disciplinary fields of civil engineering, environmental sciences, urban hydrology, landscape architecture, green building, public outreach and politics. Students will be expected to conduct field investigations, review scientific data and create indicator reports, working with stakeholders and presenting the results at an annual symposium. There is no metaphor like water itself to describe the cumulative effects of our practices, with every upstream action having an impact downstream. In our urban environment, too often we find degraded streams filled with trash, silt, weeds and dilapidated structures. The water may look clean, but is it? We blame others, but the condition of the creeks is directly related to how we manage our water resources and our land. In cities, these resources are often our homes, our streets and our communities. This course will define the current issues of the urban ecosystem and how we move toward managing this system in a sustainable manner. We will gain an understanding of the dynamic, reciprocal relationship between practices in an watershed and its waterfront. Topics discussed include: drinking water quality and protection, green infrastructure, urban impacts of climate change, watershed monitoring, public education, creating strategies and more. Natural Sciences & Mathematics Sector
ENVS 3053-401 Sustainable Development And Culture in Latin America Teresa Gimenez MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This interdisciplinary course exposes students to the three dimensions of sustainable development -environmental, economic, and social- through an examination of three products -peyote, coca, and coffee- that are crucial in shaping modern identity in areas of Latin America. The course integrates this analysis of sustainable development in relation to cultural sustainability and cultural practices associated with peyote, coca, and coffee and their rich, traditional heritage and place in literature, film, and the arts. This is an upper level seminar open to majors and minors of Spanish and those who have completed Pre-requiste SPAN 1800 or SPAN 1900 or permission of the Undergraduate Chair. LALS3910401, SPAN3910401 Cross Cultural Analysis Perm Needed From Instructor
ENVS 4250-001 Our Water Planet Jon Hawkings MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM Water, the “universal solvent”, is a miraculous substance that makes Earth unique
in the solar system and, possibly, the galaxy. This course will dive into the
wonderous physical and chemical properties of water from the micro (water
properties and composition) to macro (global water resources) scale and highlight
its role in sculpting almost every facet of Earth’s environment. Water will be
examined within a scientific framework, from wicked water problems to
wonderous water bodies to the paradox of an abundant yet incredibly precious
resource. We will study the vital role of water in life, its movement across around
our planet, its part in the growth (and downfall) of civilizations, and the ways in
which humans are having profound impacts on all aspects of the water cycle. We
will also look at how water interacts with other Earth systems, use topical case
studies to examine water issues in the Anthropocene and examine what lies in
store for water quality and availability in the twenty-first century during an era of
rapid environmental change. Assignments will include class presentations, an
opinion piece, and a review article for a leading journal. This course will include a
local field trip.
ENVS 4600-001 Environmental Policy Joseph J Lisa R 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Environmental policy
ENVS 4997-001 Senior Thesis Jane E Dmochowski M 10:15 AM-11:14 AM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
ENVS 5100-660 Proseminar: Contemporary Issues in Environmental Studies Yvette L Bordeaux M 5:15 PM-8:14 PM A detailed, comprehensive investigation of selected environmental problems. This is the first course taken by students entering the Master of Environmental Studies Program.
ENVS 5220-660 Sustainable Agriculture and Product Stewardship. Linda Froelich This course will focus on how food is produced around the globe and inputs required to ensure food security. Topics explored include: Integrated Pest Management, Precision Agriculture, Product Stewardship, Biodiversity, Biologicals, Organics and Synthetic Products, GMOs, Sustainable Development Goals, Regulations, Stakeholders (Growers, NGOs, consumers, etc.), and Food waste.
ENVS 5404-660 Wetlands Sarah A Willig W 5:15 PM-8:14 PM The course focuses on the natural history of different wetland types including climate, geology, and,hydrology factors that influence wetland development Associated soil, vegetation, and wildlife characteristics and key ecological processes will be covered as well. Lectures will be supplemented with weekend wetland types, ranging from tidal salt marshes to non-tidal marshes, swamps, and glacial bogs in order to provide field experience in wetland identification, characterization, and functional assessment. Outside speakers will discuss issues in wetland seed bank ecology, federal regulation, and mitigation. Students will present a short paper on the ecology of a wetland animal and a longer term paper on a selected wetland topic. Readings from the text, assorted journal papers, government technical documents, and book excerpts will provide a broad overview of the multifaceted field of wetland study.
ENVS 5600-660 Developing Environmental Policy Joseph J Lisa R 5:15 PM-8:14 PM When we think of environmental policies in the USA, we may think of one or more laws geared to improve our nation's air, water, ecosystems, and biodiversity. However, environmental policies and policy-making comprise more than just specific laws and regulations. Making and implementing environmental policy is a process influenced by multiple political, cultural, and economic factors in addition to scientific factors, all of which impact the ability of policies to be effective, that is, to actually improve the environment. In this course, we develop a framework to analyze the effectiveness of the social actors, process and outcomes of environmental policy-making. We ask questions such as: How do policy makers define environmental problems and solutions? Who are the social actors involved in the process? How are policies created and negotiated? What underlying assumptions and realities about the roles of government and society shape policy instruments and design? Are science and risk accurate or distorted? How are social and environmental justice intertwined? To answer these complex questions, we contextualize and critically analyze policies to determine how both government and society impact on regulatory approaches. We study the institutions involved and examine social and ecological outcomes of environmental policies. We also discuss contemporary issues and policy situations that arise throughout the course of the semester, and comment on them in a class blog. Finally, students will select an environmental issue and formulate a policy proposal to recommend to decisionmakers.
ENVS 5706-660 Modeling Geographical Objects Jill Kelly This course offers a broad and practical introduction to the acquisition, storage, retrieval, maintenance, use, and presentation of digital cartographic data with both image and drawing based geographic information systems (GIS) for a variety of environmental science, planning, and management applications. Its major objectives are to provide the training necessary to make productive use of at least two well known software packages, and to establish the conceptual foundation on which to build further skills and knowledge in late practice. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=ENVS5706660
ENVS 6300-660 The Future of water Jon B Freedman
Charles Iceland
Francesca Mccann
W 5:15 PM-8:14 PM From Wall Street to rural Sub-Saharan Africa, technology innovation to aging infrastructure-this course will explore the; impact of water and consider what future leaders need to know about the dynamics of the industry, investment and business opportunities, and water-related risk; Opportunities for water are booming around the world, in large part because of existing or looming shortages and decades of underinvestment, population growth, rapid industrialization and urbanization, pollution, and climate change. Water is the only irreplaceable natural resource on the planet. Its critical role in every aspect of the global economy, could, in fact, lead it to be the next gold or the next oil; This course will address the fundamentals of the water sector from an international perspective. The future of water will be critical to our global economic, social and political development and will likely become one of the most influential factors in business decisions for the future. Furthermore, it is essential for leaders across all sectors-from pharmaceuticals to financials, energy to agriculture-to understand how to sustainably manage and account for water resources, capitalize on new technologies, mitigate water-related risks and navigate through complex and dynamic policy and regulation. The course will engage students in high-level discussion and strategy formation, challenging them to develop creative and sustainable solutions to some of the greatest challenges facing environmental, business and water industry leaders today. Interactive sessions and projects will provide an introduction to appropriately managing, valuing and investing in water assets to create sustainable and compelling business opportunities. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=ENVS6300660
ENVS 6414-660 Creating Gateways to the Land with Smarter Conservation Strategies T 5:15 PM-8:14 PM Conservationists were long accused of ignoring the needs of human communities. often been thought of as protecting land from people. Now, the conservation movement is embracing a different viewprotecting land with and for people. As a result innovative programs have been developed that connect people to nature, thereby helping to facilitate land conservation. This interdisciplinary course will integrate concepts in scientific method, study design, ecology, and conservation with a focus on birds in order to foster an understanding of how research can inform management of wildlife populations and communities. Topics will include wildlife management, habitat restoration, geographical information systems (GIS), sustainable agriculture, integrated land-use management, and vegetation analysis. This course will also provide opportunities for field research and application of techniques learned in the classroom.
ENVS 6500-660 Introduction to Sustainability James R Hagan The study of sustainability-the long term viability of humans in harmony with the environment-has been identified as a critical issue for society and industry and is evolving to examine how society should conduct itself in order to survive.There are a number of aspects to how society organizes its activities that will be reviewed. Issues such as sustainable products, sustainable agriculture, sustainable forestry, sustainable fisheries, and sustainable communities, to name just a few, are areas that are the focus of the need for change. This course will review the various aspects of sustainability in society and ask each student to conduct a qualitative comparison of the life cycle impacts of two products that provide the same function to determine which is more sustainable and if and how they could both be made sustainable for the long term.
ENVS 6540-660 Corporate Sustainability Management & Communication W 5:15 PM-8:14 PM Sustainability (i.e. the long term viability of humans in harmony with the environment) has been identified as a critical issue for society and industry. The question is what actions individual companies can take to promote sustainability. This course will focus on the approach to both managing and communicating the corporate sustainability function. The opportunity that exists is to demonstrate that sustainability can reduce costs and enhance the corporations reputation. A sustainable approach looks to change core business activities that consume resources and generate waste (now to be seen as by-products) so that the new business model will not only have a beneficial impact on the environment but also generate better products, reduce costs and improve trust between society and the company. The implementation of sustainability management systems, which assists in aligning business operations with sustainable principles, has the potential for significant benefit for industry as well as for the long term viability of the human population and the natural ecosystem. The key will be to communicate the approach and the benefit so that investors, employees and the public understand what is at stake.
ENVS 6551-660 The Principles of Mapping for Environmental Justice T 5:15 PM-8:14 PM Environmental Justice (EJ) mapping examines the intersection of environmental burdens and the vulnerable communities disproportionately impacted by their harm. From redlining to the static maps that first showed the correlation between race and waste, and moving through to today's truly dynamic EJ mapping tools, The Principles of Mapping for Environmental Justice explores how mapping quite literally put EJ on the environmental movement landscape. This is not a GIS course, nor a course on EJ generally, but an examination into the core components that are inherent to EJ mapping principles. Come explore the indicators and methodologies used by federal, state and local governments and the policy they influence, such as President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative.
ENVS 6611-001 Floodplain Management in a Changing Climate R 5:15 PM-8:14 PM According to a 2019 paper by Scott A. Kulp and Benjamin H. Strauss in the journal Nature Communications, 230 million people worldwide occupy land that is less than 1 meter above current high tide. These lands will be inundated by sea level rise by the end of this century, or earlier. Add to this the inherent flood risks in riverine and urban settings. How do we prepare and adapt? The class will explore the challenge of floodplain management in a changing climate through lectures, talks by guest experts, readings and multimedia, and exploration in the field. We will take a field trip to the New Jersey coast to witness home elevations, beach nourishment, and locales that are already experiencing chronic tidal flooding; we will meet with municipal officials challenged by increasingly persistent sea level rise. Our class will look at the National Flood Insurance Program, examine its goals, critique its 50 year history and debate reforms to the program at the same time the US Congress is considering reauthorization of the program. We will look at resiliency efforts that states and local governments are pursuing and the new city- and state-level position of Chief Resiliency Officer. In class we will cover hazard mitigation planning, land use, hard and natural infrastructure, regulations, the Community Rating System and other issues pertaining to flooding and climate change, including social justice and public health issues. Throughout the course, material will be introduced to prepare the student to take the Certified Floodplain Manager exam administered by the Association of State Floodplain Managers. This optional test, should the student pass, will provide credentialing that is well recognized in the United States.
ENVS 9900-660 Masters Thesis Yvette L Bordeaux While working with an advisor students conduct research and write a thesis.