Penn Arts & Sciences Logo

Courses for Spring 2021

Select a class for more information.

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ENVS 060-401 Global Environmental History From Paleolithic To the Present Marcia Susan Norton
Anne K Berg
MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM This course explores the changing relationships between human beings and the natural world from early history to the present. We will consider the various ways humans across the globe have interacted with and modified the natural world by using fire, domesticating plants and animals, extracting minerals and energy, designing petro-chemicals, splitting atoms and leaving behind wastes of all sorts. Together we consider the impacts, ranging from population expansion to species extinctions and climate change. We examine how human interactions with the natural world relate to broader cultural processes such as religion, colonialism and capitalism, and why it is important to understand the past, even the deep past, in order to rise to the challenges of the present. HIST060401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=ENVS060401
ENVS 100-001 Introduction To Environmental Science Alain Plante R 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course will explore the physical science of the Earth's environment and human interactions with it. Coverage will include the Earth's various environmental systems, various environmental problems, and the direct and indirect causes of these environmental problems. Fresman seminar will mirror the ENVS100 recitation, and have additional discussions and social media projects. Physical World Sector (all classes) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=ENVS100001
ENVS 100-301 How Earth Works Alain Plante T 01:00 PM-02:00 PM This course will explore the physical science of the Earth's environment and human interactions with it. Coverage will include the Earth's various environmental systems, various environmental problems, and the direct and indirect causes of these environmental problems. Fresman seminar will mirror the ENVS100 recitation, and have additional discussions and social media projects. Physical World Sector (all classes) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Freshman Seminar</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Lecture and Recitation (see below)</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=ENVS100301
ENVS 151-401 Forest Worlds Simon J Richter TR 07:00 PM-08:30 PM The destruction of the world's forests through wild fires, deforestation, and global heating threatens planetary bio-diversity and may even, as a 2020 shows, trigger civilizational collapse. Can the humanities help us think differently about the forest? At the same time that forests of the world are in crisis, the "rights of nature" movement is making progress in forcing courts to acknowledge the legal "personhood" of forests and other ecosystems. The stories that humans have told and continue to tell about forests are a source for the imaginative and cultural content of that claim. At a time when humans seem unable to curb the destructive practices that place themselves, biodiversity, and forests at risk, the humanities give us access to a record of the complex inter-relationship between forests and humanity. Forest Worlds serves as an introduction to the environmental humanities. The environmental humanities offer a perspective on the climate emergency and the human dimension of climate change that are typically not part of the study of climate science or climate policy. Students receive instruction in the methods of the humanities - cultural analysis and interpretation of literature and film - in relation to texts that illuminate patterns of human behavior, thought, and affect with regard to living in and with nature. CIMS152401, COML154401, GRMN151401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=ENVS151401
ENVS 312-401 Ocean-Atmosphere Dynamics and Implications For Future Climate Change Irina Marinov M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This course covers the fundamentals of atmosphere and ocean dynamics, and aims to put these in the context of climate change in the 21st century. Large-scale atmospheric and oceanic circulation, the global energy balance, and the global energy balance, and the global hydrological cycle. We will introduce concepts of fluid dynamics and we will apply these to the vertical and horizontal motions in the atmosphere and ocean. Concepts covered include: hydrostatic law, buoyancy and convection, basic equations of fluid motions, Hadley and Ferrel cells in the atmosphere, thermohaline circulation, Sverdrup ocean flow, modes of climate variability (El-Nino, North Atlantic Oscillation, Southern Annular Mode). The course will incorporate student led discussions based on readings of the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report and recent literature on climate change. Aimed at undergraduate or graduate students who have no prior knowledge of meteorology or oceanography or training in fluid mechanics. Previous background in calculus and/or introductory physics is helpful. This is a general course which spans many subdisciplines (fluid mechanics, atmospheric science, oceanography, hydrology). PHYS314401, ENVS640401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span>
ENVS 399-401 Junior Research Seminar Maria-Antonia Andrews T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This seminar is designed to help Juniors prepare for the Senior Thesis research. Topic selection, advisor identification, funding options, and basic research methods will be discussed. GEOL399401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=ENVS399401
ENVS 416-401 Freshwater Ecology Melinda Daniels MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Survey of the physical, chemical and biological properties of freshwater ecosystems, both riverine and lentic, natural and polluted. Prerequisite: One semester of college chemistry. BIOL415401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span>
ENVS 498-001 Senior Thesis Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">See Dept. For Section Numbers</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
ENVS 498-145 Senior Thesis Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Asynchronous Format</span>
ENVS 498-146 Senior Thesis Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
ENVS 498-147 Senior Thesis Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
ENVS 498-148 Senior Thesis Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
ENVS 498-149 Senior Thesis Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
ENVS 498-150 Senior Thesis Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
ENVS 498-151 Senior Thesis Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
ENVS 498-153 Senior Thesis: Quantifying Organic Functional Group Composition of Aerosols At Pismo Beach Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
ENVS 616-660 Risk Assessment: Science & Policy Challenges Richard Pepino R 04:30 PM-07:30 PM How do government policy-makers make decisions about potential threats to human health and the environment in the face of scientific uncertainty? The course develops the concept of Risk Assessment from the publication of the 1983 National Research Council (NRC) report commonly known as the "Red Book" which was used to rank the initial hazardous waste sites under the Superfund program. Using a variety of teaching tools, including lectures, panel discussions, and case studies, the course examines how public policy decisions regarding environmental risk are made and how effective those decisions are at reducing risks to affected populations. The course focuses on the complex interaction of science, economics, politics, laws, and regulations in dealing with environmental and public health risks. The course will begin with a review of the policy process and methods used in evaluating human health and environmental risks, including the traditional steps in the risk assessment process, including quantitative and qualitative aspects of hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. The course will then focus on how scientific uncertainty, risk perceptions, socio-economic disparities, risk communication, and politics influence environmental risk-based decision-making. Issues such as special populations (e.g., children, elderly, immune-compromised, woman of pregnancy age, etc.) must be considered when developing risk reduction strategies. The use of the "precautionary principle" will be discussed in the context of different types of environmental stressors (e.g., pesticides, chemicals, climate change, air pollution, water quality, and land use) and how this important controversial principle is applied differently in contrasting national and European risk management policies. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=ENVS616660
ENVS 625-660 Environmental Justice Katera Ya Shea Moore R 04:30 PM-07:30 PM This course will focus on a critical exploration of the social movements and policies related to environmental injustices from a community development perspective. The course includes an overview of the Environmental Justice Movement as an evolution from the Civil Rights Movement as well as an exploration of the political economy of environmental inequalities and uneven development that contribute to urban land use patterns that catalyze a range of environmental injustices. This course will emphasize authentic engagement of frontline communities to address a range of environmental inequalities using urban planning and community based solutions. Exploring a Philadelphia-area organization is a key component in this course. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Undergraduates Need Permission</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
ENVS 629-660 The US Water Industry in the 21st Century Howard Mark Neukrug T 04:30 PM-07:30 PM The course will explore all 4 sectors of the water business in the United States: The Drinking Water Industry, The Stormwater Utility, Water Resources (rivers, streams, reservoirs) Management and the Water Pollution Control Industry. The course will have 2 primary foci: 1. The influences on the industry from new technologies and infrastructure, acceptable levels of risk, public and private sector competition, climate change, the bottled water industry, resource recovery, rates and affordability and other influences will be investigated. 2. The management of a 21st century utility will be explored, including topics of organization and leadership, the role of environmentalism, infrastructure financing, water / wastewater treatment facility operations, public affairs and media, and designing a capital improvement program are examples of topic areas. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
ENVS 640-401 Ocean-Atmosphere Dynamics and Implications For Future Climate Change Irina Marinov M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This course covers the fundamentals of atmosphere and ocean dynamics, and aims to put these in the context of climate change in the 21st century. large-scale atmospheric and oceanic circulation, the global energy balance, and the global energy balance, and the global hydrological cycle. We will introduce concepts of fluid dynamics and we will apply these to the vertical and horizontal motions in the atmosphere and ocean. Concepts covered include: hydrostatic law, buoyancy and convection, basic equations of fluid motions, Hadley and Ferrel cells in the atmosphere, thermohaline circulation, Sverdrup ocean flow, modes of climate variability (El-Nino, North Atlantic Oscillation, Southern Annular Mode). The course will incorporate student led discussions based on readings of the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report and recent literature on climate change. Aimed at undergraduate or graduate students who have no prior knowledge of meteorology or oceanography or training in fluid mechanics. Previous background in calculus and/or introductory physics is helpful. This is a general course which spans many subdisciplines (fluid mechanics, atmospheric science, oceanography, hydrology). PHYS314401, ENVS312401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span>
ENVS 641-660 World Water Forum Stanley Laskowski CANCELED This one-week course will be held as part of the World Water Forum 6 on March 12-17, 2012 in Marseille, France (see www.worldwaterforum6.org for details). This tri-annual Forum is the world's largest gathering of those interested in global water issues and over 25,000 are expected to attend. Attendees at the Forum will include world leaders in water, sanitation, and health issues and will represent governments, NGOs, academia, the private sector, and the general public. Students will be involved in some combination of the following: : (1) planning, organizing and/or conducting an event at the Forum; (2) delivering a presentation/poster; (3) researching specific topics related to the Forum; (4) interviewing world experts at the Forum.
ENVS 644-660 Energy, Waste & the Environment Reto Giere W 05:00 PM-08:00 PM The aim of this course is to provide an incentive to use geochemical and mineralogical principles to address and solve major environmental problems. The students identify the problems that are associated with different types of waste. This course covers a wide range of problems associated with the waste arising from the generation of electricity. The main topics will be the uranium cycle, characterization of nuclear waste, and the containment and disposal of nuclear waste. Based on insights from the nuclear fuel cycle, solutions are presented that diminish the environmental impacts of coal and biomass combustion products, incineration of municipal solid waste, toxic waste due to refuse incineration, and landfills and landfill gases. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=ENVS644660
ENVS 648-660 Food & Agricultural Policy Michael Kulik W 05:00 PM-08:00 PM Food is central to our daily lives, yet we seldom think about the political or social implications of what we eat. In this course, students will study how societies produce, distribute, market and consume food, with an emphasis on American politics and food systems to develop an understanding of how policies policies are shaped by power relations, institutions, and ideas. Topics include food systems, food and agriculture industries, farming practices, sustainable agriculture, food security, genetically modified foods, hunger, obesity, nutrition policy, food labeling and marketing, fast food, junk food, and more. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
ENVS 674-660 Life Cycle Assessment Nancy B English R 06:00 PM-09:00 PM In order to make sensible decisions on products or projects, people need to understand the environmental impacts of these actions. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a process to assess environmental impacts throughout the different stages of a product or project's life. This seminar is intended to be comprehensive and covers material extraction, processing, manufacture, distribution, use and end of life reuse, recovery or disposal. The objective of conducting an LCA is to compare the full range of environmental impacts that emanate from the provision of these products or services and then use that information to improve the situation to minimize or eliminate harm. The focus of this class will be to understand the phases of an LCA as well as conduct LCAs that compare the impacts of two related options. This course will enable the student to conduct LCAs and examine the use of software that could be used in this regard.The classic examples are cloth vs. disposable diapers, paper vs. ceramic cups, and so on. This course will enable the student to conduct LCAs and examine the use of software that could be used in this regard. Prerequisite: If course requirement not met, permissionof instructor required. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=ENVS674660
ENVS 681-660 Modeling Geograph Space Charles Dana Tomlin W 05:00 PM-08:00 PM This course explores the nature and use of raster-based geographic information systems (GIS) for the analysis and synthesis of spatial patterns and processes through 'cartographic modeling'. Cartographic modeling is a general but well defined methodology that can be used to address a wide variety of analytical mapping applications in a clear and consistent manner. It does so by decomposing both data and data-processing tasks into elemental components that can then be recomposed with relative ease and with great flexibility. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Undergraduates Need Permission</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
ENVS 682-660 Leading Change For Sustainability Kimberly L Quick M 05:00 PM-08:00 PM Sustainability presents both a challenge and an opportunity for society. Issues like climate change, pollution, resource depletion, and population imbalance are stressing the planet's capacity in ways that threaten our ability to sustain thriving and just societies. At the same time, these systemic problems are unfolding too slowly to prompt most of us to take serious and significant action, or to trigger meaningful responses from our political and business leaders. People equate sustainability with efficiency, waste minimization, and pollution prevention - all worthy goals - but at the current rate of consumption and growth these approaches alone will not create the future of abundance and equity that we desire. To quote author and MIT professor John Ehrenfeld, "Reducing unsustainability - although critical - will not create sustainability." What will it take to extricate us from the current predicament and forge a new path? In this class, we will examine underlying psychological and cultural barriers to sustainability and discuss strategies for surmounting them. Students will learn leadership competencies and practices to help them more effectively lead change efforts for sustainability. Readings and discussions will explore the application of positive psychology to leverage the human technologies of creativity and collaboration in the pursuit of a more balanced and sustainable relationship with others and our ecosystems, and to shift the sustainability dialogue from the current problem-oriented approach to a vision of human wellbeing and planetary flourishing. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
ENVS 684-660 Ecology, Management, and Advocacy of Urban Forests Sarah A Willig M 05:00 PM-08:00 PM Urban forests provide ecological and socio-economic benefits ranging from improving air, water, and soil quality to creating wildlife habitat to enhancing thermal comfort and the health of individuals and whole communities to increasing property values and more. We will explore research on the nature, function, and value of urban forests. We will investigate reforestation efforts in Philadelphia, Baltimore, New York, and Pittsburgh with projects typically involving deer control, invasive plant removal, planting of native trees and shrubs increasingly propagated from local seed sources, maintenance, and monitoring. We will learn about the myriad advocacy and education programs supporting urban forests. Speakers from the US Forest Service, Philadelphia Parks and Recreation, and TreePittsburgh will expand our understanding of these important ecosystems. Five weekend field trips to Fairmount Park in Philadelphia, Baltimore, and NYC will illustrate the character of urban forests and reforestation projects. Students will research and present on an urban forest system (from Philadelphia or elsewhere) and research a topic of interest related to course content. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
ENVS 699-660 Mes Capstone Seminar Yvette L Bordeaux T 06:00 PM-09:00 PM This course is designed to help students successfully complete their MES Capstone. A set of milestones will be set and regular meetings will be held in groups and individually to aid the student as they complete the research portion of their degree.We will be working together to complete a series of steps towards the final project. These steps fall into five major areas 1) Reviewing the literature; 2) Finding a model; 3) Framing your research; 4) managing data; and 5) Writing your results. Throughout the semester, we will also discuss career goals and the job search. Prerequisite: Project proposal and Online Application equired for course regisration. See MES Office and "Guide to the Capatone" for more information. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
GEOL 103-601 Natural Disturbances and Disasters Siobhan Whadcoat M 05:00 PM-08:00 PM Natural disasters play a fundamental role in shaping landscapes and structuring ecosystems. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to both the natural and social science of disasters. This course will explore the geologic processes that cause natural disasters, the ecological and social consequences of disasters, and the role of human behavior in disaster management and mitigation. Through exploring these concepts, this class will provide you with a broad background in the geosciences and the basic tools needed to understand: how earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, and hurricanes occur; the myriad of ways that we can mitigate against their impacts; and the way in which we can "calculate the cost" of these disasters. Physical World Sector (all classes) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Only Open To LPS Students</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=GEOL103601
GEOL 125-001 Earth Through Time Ileana Perez-Rodriguez TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Origin of Earth, continents, and life. Continental movements, changing climates, and evolving life. Physical World Sector (all classes) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=GEOL125001
GEOL 130-001 Oceanography: Oceans & Climate Jane E Dmochowski TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM The oceans cover over 2/3 of the Earth's surface. This course introduces basic oceanographic concepts such as plate tectonics, marine sediments, physical and chemical properties of seawater, ocean circulation, air-sea interactions, waves, tides, nutrient cycles in the ocean, biology of the oceans, and environmental issues related to the marine environment. Physical World Sector (all classes) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Structured,Active,In-Class Learning</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=GEOL130001
GEOL 130-002 Oceanography Jane E Dmochowski TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM The oceans cover over 2/3 of the Earth's surface. This course introduces basic oceanographic concepts such as plate tectonics, marine sediments, physical and chemical properties of seawater, ocean circulation, air-sea interactions, waves, tides, nutrient cycles in the ocean, biology of the oceans, and environmental issues related to the marine environment. Physical World Sector (all classes) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Structured,Active,In-Class Learning</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=GEOL130002
GEOL 305-401 Earth Surface Processes Douglas J. Jerolmack MW 10:00 AM-11:30 AM Patterns on the Earth's surface arise due to the transport of sediment by water and wind, with energy that is supplied by climate and tectonic deformation of the solid Earth. This course presents a treatment of the processes of erosion and deposition that shape landscapes. Emphasis will be placed on using simple physical principles as a tool for (a) understanding landscape patterns including drainage networks, river channels and deltas, desert dunes, and submarine channels, (b) reconstructing past environmental conditions using the sedimentary record, and (c) the management of rivers and landscapes under present and future climate scenarios. The course will conclude with a critical assessment of landscape evolution on other planets, including Mars. GEOL545401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
GEOL 399-401 Junior Research Seminar Maria-Antonia Andrews T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This seminar is designed to help Juniors prepare for the Senior Thesis research. Topic selection, advisor identification, funding options, and basic research methods will be discussed. ENVS399401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=GEOL399401
GEOL 403-001 Meteorology and Earth's Climate System Gomaa Ibrahim Omar TR 10:30 AM-11:50 AM This course deals with the study of the two main parts of Earth's climate system, the atmosphere and the ocean. It explores, qualitatively and quantitatively,the physical laws, geological and geographical processes, and mass and energy budgets that govern these two parts and their combined influence on Earth's past and present climate. Main topics covered include, but not limited to, properties of air and water; physical balances; equilibrium states; transport of heat and mass; clouds; precipitation; storms; regional and global climate; ozone layer; seasons and climate; weather forecasting; atmospheric optics; ocean currents; ocean bathymetry, salinity, and atmospheric forcing; history of Earth's changing climate in the geologic record, global warming, and how climate impacts humans and how do humans impact climate. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=GEOL403001
GEOL 479-001 Macroevolution Lauren C Sallan TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Macroevolution, or evolution above the population level and on long timescales,as a field addresses fundamental questions about the origins of life, past and present.These include but are not limited to: How are highly dissimilar speciesrelated? Why are animals on distant continents so similar? How and when did major groups, like birds or mammals, originate? What drives evolutionary arms races? Why are there so many more species of beetle than crocodile? Why are there more species in the tropics than the arctic? Did dinosaursprevent the diversification of mammals? Why do some animals survive mass extinction? How can invasive species spread so rapidly? Students will learn importantconcepts underlying our understanding of modern biodiversity and the fossil record, as well as how to use different methods and lines of evidence, including evolutionary trees (phylogeny), fossil databases, past climate and global events,mathematical modeling, and even modern genomics, to answer fundamental questions about the evolution of life. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=GEOL479001
GEOL 498-001 Senior Thesis Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: GEOL 400-level and declaration of the EASC major. The Earth Science major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of GEOL 399 and two semesters of GEOL 498. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">See Dept. For Section Numbers</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
GEOL 498-140 Senior Thesis Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: GEOL 400-level and declaration of the EASC major. The Earth Science major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of GEOL 399 and two semesters of GEOL 498. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
GEOL 498-141 Senior Thesis Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: GEOL 400-level and declaration of the EASC major. The Earth Science major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of GEOL 399 and two semesters of GEOL 498. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
GEOL 498-142 Senior Thesis Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: GEOL 400-level and declaration of the EASC major. The Earth Science major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of GEOL 399 and two semesters of GEOL 498. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
GEOL 498-143 Senior Thesis Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: GEOL 400-level and declaration of the EASC major. The Earth Science major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of GEOL 399 and two semesters of GEOL 498. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
GEOL 498-144 Senior Thesis Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: GEOL 400-level and declaration of the EASC major. The Earth Science major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of GEOL 399 and two semesters of GEOL 498. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
GEOL 498-145 Senior Thesis Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: GEOL 400-level and declaration of the EASC major. The Earth Science major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of GEOL 399 and two semesters of GEOL 498. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
GEOL 498-146 Senior Thesis Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: GEOL 400-level and declaration of the EASC major. The Earth Science major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of GEOL 399 and two semesters of GEOL 498. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
GEOL 498-147 Senior Thesis Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: GEOL 400-level and declaration of the EASC major. The Earth Science major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of GEOL 399 and two semesters of GEOL 498. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
GEOL 545-401 Adv Earth Surf Processes Douglas J. Jerolmack MW 10:00 AM-11:30 AM Pattern on the Earth's surface arise due to the transport of sediment by water and wind, with energy that is supplied by climate and tectonic deformation of the solid Earth. This course presents a treatment of the processes of erosion and deposition that shape landscapes. Emphasis will be placed on using simple physical principles as a tool for (a) understanding landscape patterns including drainage networks, river channels and deltas, desert dunes, and submarine channels, (b) reconstructing past environmental conditions using the sedimentary record, and (c) the management of rivers and landscapes under present and future climate scenarios. The course will conclude with a critical assessment of landscape evolution on other planets, including Mars. GEOL305401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
GEOL 643-690 Sustainable Development of Water Resource Systems J. Anthony Sauder W 05:00 PM-08:00 PM The evaluation of technical, social and economic constraints on the design of water supply and sanitation projects. The focus on sustainable design emphasizes how technical solutions fit within the appropriate social context. Case studies are used to demonstrate these principles across a range of examples from developed and developing countries including detailed studies from rural communities with limited resources. CBE543690 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Undergraduates Need Permission</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
GEOL 644-690 Environmental Response Mitch A Cron R 06:00 PM-09:00 PM The superfund law authorizes the president to respond to releases of hazardous substances into the environment in order to protect public health and the environment. This course will focus on topics related to such responses, including environmental investigation and risk assessment, environmental remediation techniques, and related topics. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
GEOL 658-690 Environmental Statistical Analysis Carl Mastropaolo W 05:00 PM-08:00 PM Statistical analysis of data from geological, geotechnical, and geohydrologic sources. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
GEOL 661-690 Environmental Groundwater Hydrology Carl Mastropaolo M 05:00 PM-08:00 PM This course is designed to introduce the major definitions and concepts regarding groundwater flow and contaminant transport. The theory and underlying concepts, including mathematical derivations of governing equations used to model groundwater flow and contaminant transport, will be discussed and applications to environmental problems addressed. Upon completion of this course, students should expect to have acquired the skills necessary to pursue course work in flow and transport numerical and analytical modeling. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
GEOL 668-690 Geomechanics: Fluids George E Duda T 06:00 PM-09:00 PM Static and Dynamic mechanical properties of fluid in earth materials, as applied to the Hydrologic Sciences; Principles of Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics applied to open channel flow in earth materials; flow through gates, weirs, spillways, and culverts; Applications of Darcy's Law to subsurface flow and seepage. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
GEOL 672-690 Landslides Siobhan Whadcoat R 04:30 PM-07:30 PM Landslides are important geomorphic agents in mountainous terrain, mobilizing sediment and playing a key role in controlling relief and elevation. The work of landslides is often characterized by their magnitude-frequency, which also has direct implications for people, property, and infrastructure in mountainous terrain, and for the approaches taken to minimize the risk from landslides. This course will introduce students to a conceptual understanding of landslides at a range of spatial scales, including the mechanics of the processes governing landslides from trigger to deposition. Methods of slope monitoring and the varied approaches to landslide risk mitigation and management will be explored, with a range of geotechnical and environmental applications. This course includes lab-based sessions to demonstrate simple techniques to understand fundamental landslide processes, and applications of GIS technology to explore slope monitoring and failure prediction. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=GEOL672690
GEOL 699-690 Project Design Yvette L Bordeaux T 06:00 PM-09:00 PM This course is designed to prepare Master of Science in Applied Geosciences students to undertake their Project Design exercise. In this course, we discuss how to identify an appropriate research project, how to design a research plan, and how to prepare a detailed proposal. By the end of the course, each student is expected to have completed a Project Design proposal. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
GEOL 750-301 Topics in Earth Science Joseph S Francisco T 06:00 PM-08:00 PM
F 03:00 PM-04:00 PM
This course will use the weekly EES seminar series to survey historic breakthrogh papers or topics in the earth sciences, as well as modern papers - written by the seminar speakers - that often put the classics in perspective. Graduate students (Ph.D. only) in the Department of Earth and Environmental Science will engage in the material through reading, presentation, and discussion. The course has several goals. (1.) To engender an understanding and appreciation of major breakthroughs in our field. (2.) To develop skills in presenting and discussing scientific results. And (3.) to refine students' understanding of what constitutes great science. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span>

Department of Earth and Environmental Science / University of Pennsylvania, 251 Hayden Hall, 240 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316