Courses for Spring 2022

Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
ENVS 093-401 Latinx Envirmntl Justice Teresa Gimenez WILL 202 MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM
T 02:00 PM-05:00 PM
This course explores the involvement of the Latinx environmental justice movement since the 1960s. It addresses theories and concepts of environmental racism and environmental justice, underscoring how Latinx have challenged, expanded, and contributed to the environmental justice discourse. In this course, students will explore national case studies of environmental and racial injustice as they bear on Latinx communities both in rural areas and in urban barrios throughout the United States. The course will analyze these case studies through the lens of Latinx artistic and literary texts (essays, paintings, short stories, documentaries, and short films) as they provide a unique historic and multicultural perspective of the Latinx experience with environmental injustice and of how Latinxs imagine alternative transitions and responses to environmental marginalization. In addition, the works of Latinx artists and writers will serve as case studies to deconstruct racial stereotypes of Latinxs as unconcerned about environmental issues, shedding light on how they share a broad engagement with environmental ideas. The case studies analyzed in this course emphasize race and class differences between farmworkers and urban barrio residents and how they affect their respective struggles. The unit on farmworkers will focus on workplace health issues such as toxic chemicals and collective bargaining contracts. The unit on urban barrios will focus on gentrification, affordable housing, and toxic substances in the home. We will also review current and past programs that have been organized to address the aforementioned problems. This is an Academically Based Community Service Course (ABCS course) through which students will learn from and provide support to a Latinx-serving organization in the City of Philadelphia on preventing exposure to hazardous substances, thus bridging the information gap on environmental justice issues in the Latinx community in Philadelphia. Information dissemination and education efforts will be conducted by collaborating with Esperanza Academy Charter School in Philadelphia to implement lessons on preventing exposure to hazardous substances. Studying environmental justice and pairing it with community service will heighten students' awareness of the complexities of culture, race, gender, and class while providing them with an invaluable experience of cross-cultural understanding. LALS093401, SPAN093401, URBS093401, ANTH093401 Cultural Diversity in the US An Academically Based Community Serv Course
ENVS 100-001 Introduction To Environmental Science Jesse Thornburg MEYH B1 TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course will explore the physical science of the Earth's environment and human interactions with it. Coverage will include the Earth's various environmental systems, various environmental problems, and the direct and indirect causes of these environmental problems. Fresman seminar will mirror the ENVS100 recitation, and have additional discussions and social media projects. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req.
Physical World Sector
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
ENVS 100-201 Introduction To Environmental Science Jesse Thornburg VANP 113 M 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course will explore the physical science of the Earth's environment and human interactions with it. Coverage will include the Earth's various environmental systems, various environmental problems, and the direct and indirect causes of these environmental problems. Fresman seminar will mirror the ENVS100 recitation, and have additional discussions and social media projects. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
ENVS 100-202 Introduction To Environmental Science Jesse Thornburg VANP 113 M 03:30 PM-04:30 PM This course will explore the physical science of the Earth's environment and human interactions with it. Coverage will include the Earth's various environmental systems, various environmental problems, and the direct and indirect causes of these environmental problems. Fresman seminar will mirror the ENVS100 recitation, and have additional discussions and social media projects. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
ENVS 100-203 Introduction To Environmental Science Jesse Thornburg VANP 113 M 01:45 PM-02:45 PM This course will explore the physical science of the Earth's environment and human interactions with it. Coverage will include the Earth's various environmental systems, various environmental problems, and the direct and indirect causes of these environmental problems. Fresman seminar will mirror the ENVS100 recitation, and have additional discussions and social media projects. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
ENVS 100-204 Introduction To Environmental Science Jesse Thornburg VANP 113 W 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course will explore the physical science of the Earth's environment and human interactions with it. Coverage will include the Earth's various environmental systems, various environmental problems, and the direct and indirect causes of these environmental problems. Fresman seminar will mirror the ENVS100 recitation, and have additional discussions and social media projects. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
ENVS 100-205 Introduction To Environmental Science Jesse Thornburg VANP 113 W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course will explore the physical science of the Earth's environment and human interactions with it. Coverage will include the Earth's various environmental systems, various environmental problems, and the direct and indirect causes of these environmental problems. Fresman seminar will mirror the ENVS100 recitation, and have additional discussions and social media projects. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
ENVS 100-206 Introduction To Environmental Science Jesse Thornburg VANP 113 W 01:45 PM-02:45 PM This course will explore the physical science of the Earth's environment and human interactions with it. Coverage will include the Earth's various environmental systems, various environmental problems, and the direct and indirect causes of these environmental problems. Fresman seminar will mirror the ENVS100 recitation, and have additional discussions and social media projects. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
ENVS 100-207 Introduction To Environmental Science Jesse Thornburg VANP 113 R 03:30 PM-04:30 PM This course will explore the physical science of the Earth's environment and human interactions with it. Coverage will include the Earth's various environmental systems, various environmental problems, and the direct and indirect causes of these environmental problems. Fresman seminar will mirror the ENVS100 recitation, and have additional discussions and social media projects. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
ENVS 100-208 Introduction To Environmental Science Jesse Thornburg VANP 113 F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course will explore the physical science of the Earth's environment and human interactions with it. Coverage will include the Earth's various environmental systems, various environmental problems, and the direct and indirect causes of these environmental problems. Fresman seminar will mirror the ENVS100 recitation, and have additional discussions and social media projects. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
ENVS 102-401 Humans and Earth Melissa Brown Goodall
Joseph S Francisco
Kathleen D. Morrison
MUSE B17 W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM As our planet's climate changes, it is imperative to understand the basic structures of the earth system and our connections to these, past, present, and future. The goal of this course is to help students develop an integrated understanding of climate change, linking the fundamental science - from the microscopic to the global scale - to human actions and possible futures. This team-taught course brings together approaches from environmental science, social sciences, history, and policy. Beyond providing basic climate and environmental literacy, we will also explore current and projected impacts of change, including changes to human life and biodiversity as well as other physical and biological systems. The complexity and significance of planetary change demands new ways of thinking and new approaches that transcend traditional boundaries; for that reason the course will be co-taught by instructors from the natural sciences (Joseph Francisco), social science and humanities (Kathleen Morrison), and policy (Melissa Brown Goodall). We will use the foundation provided by the two first parts of the course to address potential responses and solutions to the current crisis. The course will be divided into three units: 1. Science: what are the chemical and physical drivers of our changing climate, and what are the biological, health and environmental implications so far. 2. Impacts: how human activity has affected environments and climate so far and how climate change is currently impacting society, nature, agriculture, health, cities, and the most vulnerable communities. 3. Solutions: the roles of policy, business, agriculture, planning, and personal choices. The course is open to undergraduate students of all disciplines. While the reading and weekly assignments will be specific to the module, students may define a capstone project that reflects their academic interests. ANTH161401
ENVS 157-401 Repairing the Climate Michael Weisberg MCNB 150 TR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course is a comprehensive introduction to the climate emergency and the tools with which we can fight it. It will integrate natural science, social science, philosophy of science, history, ethics, and policy. The course opens with an overview of the historical discovery of global warming and our contemporary understanding of climate change. We then turn to the framework that the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has developed to study climate risks, focusing on both general issues and case studies throughout the world. The existence and severity of these risks raises questions of climate justice at many levels: individuals to individuals, countries to countries, and the present generation to future generations. We will study these issues in detail, and then examine the policy tools developed to address them. Although we will discuss national and sub-national policy and policy proposals such as the Green New Deal, special attention will be given to global policy tools, especially the Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Paris Agreement. In addition to standard writing assignments, students will have a chance to develop policy proposals that address the core issues of the class. PHIL157401 Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
ENVS 157-402 Repairing the Planet: Tools For the Climate Emergency Vanessa Anne Schipani DRLB 2C2 F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course is a comprehensive introduction to the climate emergency and the tools with which we can fight it. It will integrate natural science, social science, philosophy of science, history, ethics, and policy. The course opens with an overview of the historical discovery of global warming and our contemporary understanding of climate change. We then turn to the framework that the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has developed to study climate risks, focusing on both general issues and case studies throughout the world. The existence and severity of these risks raises questions of climate justice at many levels: individuals to individuals, countries to countries, and the present generation to future generations. We will study these issues in detail, and then examine the policy tools developed to address them. Although we will discuss national and sub-national policy and policy proposals such as the Green New Deal, special attention will be given to global policy tools, especially the Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Paris Agreement. In addition to standard writing assignments, students will have a chance to develop policy proposals that address the core issues of the class. PHIL157402 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
ENVS 157-403 Repairing the Planet: Tools For the Climate Emergency Vanessa Anne Schipani DRLB 2C2 F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course is a comprehensive introduction to the climate emergency and the tools with which we can fight it. It will integrate natural science, social science, philosophy of science, history, ethics, and policy. The course opens with an overview of the historical discovery of global warming and our contemporary understanding of climate change. We then turn to the framework that the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has developed to study climate risks, focusing on both general issues and case studies throughout the world. The existence and severity of these risks raises questions of climate justice at many levels: individuals to individuals, countries to countries, and the present generation to future generations. We will study these issues in detail, and then examine the policy tools developed to address them. Although we will discuss national and sub-national policy and policy proposals such as the Green New Deal, special attention will be given to global policy tools, especially the Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Paris Agreement. In addition to standard writing assignments, students will have a chance to develop policy proposals that address the core issues of the class. PHIL157403 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
ENVS 157-404 Repairing the Planet: Tools For the Climate Emergency Jacqueline Mae Wallis WILL 321 F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course is a comprehensive introduction to the climate emergency and the tools with which we can fight it. It will integrate natural science, social science, philosophy of science, history, ethics, and policy. The course opens with an overview of the historical discovery of global warming and our contemporary understanding of climate change. We then turn to the framework that the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has developed to study climate risks, focusing on both general issues and case studies throughout the world. The existence and severity of these risks raises questions of climate justice at many levels: individuals to individuals, countries to countries, and the present generation to future generations. We will study these issues in detail, and then examine the policy tools developed to address them. Although we will discuss national and sub-national policy and policy proposals such as the Green New Deal, special attention will be given to global policy tools, especially the Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Paris Agreement. In addition to standard writing assignments, students will have a chance to develop policy proposals that address the core issues of the class. PHIL157404 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
ENVS 157-405 Repairing the Planet: Tools For the Climate Emergency Jacqueline Mae Wallis WILL 321 F 01:45 PM-02:45 PM This course is a comprehensive introduction to the climate emergency and the tools with which we can fight it. It will integrate natural science, social science, philosophy of science, history, ethics, and policy. The course opens with an overview of the historical discovery of global warming and our contemporary understanding of climate change. We then turn to the framework that the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has developed to study climate risks, focusing on both general issues and case studies throughout the world. The existence and severity of these risks raises questions of climate justice at many levels: individuals to individuals, countries to countries, and the present generation to future generations. We will study these issues in detail, and then examine the policy tools developed to address them. Although we will discuss national and sub-national policy and policy proposals such as the Green New Deal, special attention will be given to global policy tools, especially the Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Paris Agreement. In addition to standard writing assignments, students will have a chance to develop policy proposals that address the core issues of the class. PHIL157405 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
ENVS 302-301 Env Sustainability: Pgs: Case Studies in Environmental Sustainability Alain Plante HAYD 358 R 01:45 PM-04:45 PM A detailed, comprehensive investigation of selected environmental sustainability problems specific to a selected region. This course aims to introduce students to myriad Earth and environmental issues (understanding how humans interact, affect and are influenced by our environment) through the analysis of several environmental case studies, as well as giving students an introduction to how complex cases are analyzed and what goes into decision-making at the individual, group, state, federal and global levels. The course includes an intensive field trip at the end of the semester - locations will vary by offering. Permission Needed From Department
Penn Global Seminar
ENVS 393-401 Latinx Envirmntl Justice Teresa Gimenez WILL 220 MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM
T 02:00 PM-05:00 PM
This course explores the involvement of the Latinx environmental justice movement since the 1960s. It addresses theories and concepts of environmental racism and environmental justice, underscoring how Latinx have challenged, expanded, and contributed to the environmental justice discourse. In this course, students will explore national case studies of environmental and racial injustice as they bear on Latinx communities both in rural areas and in urban barrios throughout the United States. The course will analyze these case studies through the lens of Latinx artistic and literary texts (essays, paintings, short stories, documentaries, and short films) as they provide a unique historic and multicultural perspective of the Latinx experience with environmental injustice and of how Latinxs imagine alternative transitions and responses to environmental marginalization. In addition, the works of Latinx artists and writers will serve as case studies to deconstruct racial stereotypes of Latinxs as unconcerned about environmental issues, shedding light on how they share a broad engagement with environmental ideas. The case studies analyzed in this course emphasize race and class differences between farmworkers and urban barrio residents and how they affect their respective struggles. The unit on farmworkers will focus on workplace health issues such as toxic chemicals and collective bargaining contracts. The unit on urban barrios will focus on gentrification, affordable housing, and toxic substances in the home. We will also review current and past programs that have been organized to address the aforementioned problems. This is an Academically Based Community Service Course (ABCS course) through which students will learn from and provide support to a Latinx-serving organization in the City of Philadelphia on preventing exposure to hazardous substances, thus bridging the information gap on environmental justice issues in the Latinx community in Philadelphia. Information dissemination and education efforts will be conducted by collaborating with Esperanza Academy Charter School in Philadelphia to implement lessons on preventing exposure to hazardous substances. Studying environmental justice and pairing it with community service will heighten students' awareness of the complexities of culture, race, gender, and class while providing them with an invaluable experience of cross-cultural understanding. SPAN393401, LALS393401, URBS393401, ANTH393401 Cultural Diversity in the US An Academically Based Community Serv Course
ENVS 399-401 Junior Research Seminar Maria-Antonia Andrews HAYD 358 T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This seminar is designed to help Juniors prepare for the Senior Thesis research. Topic selection, advisor identification, funding options, and basic research methods will be discussed. GEOL399401
ENVS 416-401 Freshwater Ecology Melinda Daniels LLAB 10 MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Survey of the physical, chemical and biological properties of freshwater ecosystems, both riverine and lentic, natural and polluted. Prerequisite: One semester of college chemistry. BIOL415401
ENVS 498-001 Senior Thesis David Goldsby HAYD 360 W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. Permission Needed From Department
See Dept. For Section Numbers
ENVS 498-139 Senior Thesis: Evaluating Corporate Net Zero Commitments: Another Example of Greenwashing? David Goldsby W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. Permission Needed From Department
ENVS 498-140 Senior Thesis: Communication and Effectiveness of Air Pollution Education in Philadelphia David Goldsby W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. Permission Needed From Department
ENVS 498-141 Senior Thesis: Transitioning To Climate Smart Agriculture in the U.S. Corn Belt David Goldsby W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. Permission Needed From Department
ENVS 498-142 Senior Thesis: Social Media and Perceived Social Consensus of Climate Change David Goldsby W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. Permission Needed From Department
ENVS 498-143 Senior Thesis: Analyzing Mandatory Tcfd Disclosure Legislation On Nz's Banking Sector David Goldsby W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. Permission Needed From Department
ENVS 498-144 Senior Thesis: Redefining Progress in Urban Landscapes Across the United States David Goldsby W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. Permission Needed From Department
ENVS 498-145 Senior Thesis: How Activist Investors Can Lead the Private Sector Emissions Fight David Goldsby W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. Permission Needed From Department
ENVS 498-146 Senior Thesis: Is Illegal Dumping A Measure of Community Disorganization in Philly? David Goldsby W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. Permission Needed From Department
ENVS 498-147 Senior Thesis: Facing Floods: Best Practices For Managed Retreat As Flood Risk Response David Goldsby W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. Permission Needed From Department
ENVS 498-148 Senior Thesis: Alluvial Coal Silt and Heavy Metal Pollution of Schuylkill River Floodplain David Goldsby W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. Permission Needed From Department
ENVS 498-149 Senior Thesis: Financing the Clean Energy Transition: Solutions, Private and Public David Goldsby W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. Permission Needed From Department
ENVS 498-150 Senior Thesis: Analysis of Past and Future Offshore Wind Development in Rhode Island David Goldsby W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. Permission Needed From Department
ENVS 498-151 Senior Thesis: Development Plan Analysis For Solar Facility in Eastwick, Pa David Goldsby W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. Permission Needed From Department
ENVS 498-152 Senior Thesis: A Search For the Most Sustainable Packaging David Goldsby W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. Permission Needed From Department
ENVS 498-153 Senior Thesis: Quantifying Organic Functional Group Composition of Aerosols At Pismo Beach Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: ENVS 400-level course and declaration of the ENCVS major. The environmental Studies major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of ENVS 399 and two semesters of ENVS 498. Permission Needed From Department
ENVS 544-401 Public Enviro Humanities Bethany Wiggin WILL 623 W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This broadly interdisciplinary course is designed for Graduate and Undergraduate Fellows in the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities (PPEH) who hail from departments across Arts and Sciences as well as other schools at the university. The course is also open to others with permission of the instructors. Work in environmental humanities by necessity spans academic disciplines. By design, it can also address and engage publics beyond traditional academic settings. This seminar, with limited enrollment, explores best practices in public environmental humanities. Students receive close mentoring to develop and execute cross-disciplinary, public engagement projects on the environment. ANTH543401, GRMN544401, COML562401, URBS544401 Permission Needed From Instructor
All Readings and Lectures in English
ENVS 606-660 Studying Ornithological Principles & Behaviors To Indicate Ecosystem Health Michael Mcgraw
Alison V Fetterman
HAYD 360 M 05:15 PM-08:15 PM This class will explore the foundations of avifaunal biology and ecology using a combination of hands-on classroom and in-the-field experiences. Classroom content includes physiology, anatomy, and morphology of birds. The fall migration of birds in North America is an epic and often tragic event. Sampling birds in migration has resulted in foundational understandings about stopover habitats, species-specific energy budgets and has helped realize the complete life cycle of hundreds of species. We will enter the field and participate in actual ornithological research, explore avifaunal ecology through birdwatching, and meet with regional leaders in the ornithological field. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ENVS606660
ENVS 616-660 Risk Assessment: Science & Policy Challenges Susan Spielberger
Richard Pepino
HAYD 358 R 05:15 PM-08:15 PM How do government policy-makers make decisions about potential threats to human health and the environment in the face of scientific uncertainty? The course develops the concept of Risk Assessment from the publication of the 1983 National Research Council (NRC) report commonly known as the "Red Book" which was used to rank the initial hazardous waste sites under the Superfund program. Using a variety of teaching tools, including lectures, panel discussions, and case studies, the course examines how public policy decisions regarding environmental risk are made and how effective those decisions are at reducing risks to affected populations. The course focuses on the complex interaction of science, economics, politics, laws, and regulations in dealing with environmental and public health risks. The course will begin with a review of the policy process and methods used in evaluating human health and environmental risks, including the traditional steps in the risk assessment process, including quantitative and qualitative aspects of hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. The course will then focus on how scientific uncertainty, risk perceptions, socio-economic disparities, risk communication, and politics influence environmental risk-based decision-making. Issues such as special populations (e.g., children, elderly, immune-compromised, woman of pregnancy age, etc.) must be considered when developing risk reduction strategies. The use of the "precautionary principle" will be discussed in the context of different types of environmental stressors (e.g., pesticides, chemicals, climate change, air pollution, water quality, and land use) and how this important controversial principle is applied differently in contrasting national and European risk management policies.
ENVS 629-660 The US Water Industry in the 21st Century Howard Mark Neukrug MCNB 309 M 05:15 PM-08:15 PM The course will explore all 4 sectors of the water business in the United States: The Drinking Water Industry, The Stormwater Utility, Water Resources (rivers, streams, reservoirs) Management and the Water Pollution Control Industry. The course will have 2 primary foci: 1. The influences on the industry from new technologies and infrastructure, acceptable levels of risk, public and private sector competition, climate change, the bottled water industry, resource recovery, rates and affordability and other influences will be investigated. 2. The management of a 21st century utility will be explored, including topics of organization and leadership, the role of environmentalism, infrastructure financing, water / wastewater treatment facility operations, public affairs and media, and designing a capital improvement program are examples of topic areas.
ENVS 641-660 World Water Forum Christiaan Morssink
Arun Deb
HAYD 360 R 05:15 PM-08:15 PM This one-week course will be held as part of the World Water Forum 6 on March 12-17, 2012 in Marseille, France (see www.worldwaterforum6.org for details). This tri-annual Forum is the world's largest gathering of those interested in global water issues and over 25,000 are expected to attend. Attendees at the Forum will include world leaders in water, sanitation, and health issues and will represent governments, NGOs, academia, the private sector, and the general public. Students will be involved in some combination of the following: : (1) planning, organizing and/or conducting an event at the Forum; (2) delivering a presentation/poster; (3) researching specific topics related to the Forum; (4) interviewing world experts at the Forum.
ENVS 644-660 Energy, Waste & the Environment Reto Giere HAYD 360 W 05:15 PM-08:15 PM The aim of this course is to provide an incentive to use geochemical and mineralogical principles to address and solve major environmental problems. The students identify the problems that are associated with different types of waste. This course covers a wide range of problems associated with the waste arising from the generation of electricity. The main topics will be the uranium cycle, characterization of nuclear waste, and the containment and disposal of nuclear waste. Based on insights from the nuclear fuel cycle, solutions are presented that diminish the environmental impacts of coal and biomass combustion products, incineration of municipal solid waste, toxic waste due to refuse incineration, and landfills and landfill gases.
ENVS 648-660 Food & Agricultural Policy Michael Kulik HAYD 358 T 05:15 PM-08:15 PM Food is central to our daily lives, yet we seldom think about the political or social implications of what we eat. In this course, students will study how societies produce, distribute, market and consume food, with an emphasis on American politics and food systems to develop an understanding of how policies policies are shaped by power relations, institutions, and ideas. Topics include food systems, food and agriculture industries, farming practices, sustainable agriculture, food security, genetically modified foods, hunger, obesity, nutrition policy, food labeling and marketing, fast food, junk food, and more.
ENVS 674-660 Life Cycle Assessment James R. Hagan
Nancy B English
R 07:00 PM-10:00 PM In order to make sensible decisions on products or projects, people need to understand the environmental impacts of these actions. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a process to assess environmental impacts throughout the different stages of a product or project's life. This seminar is intended to be comprehensive and covers material extraction, processing, manufacture, distribution, use and end of life reuse, recovery or disposal. The objective of conducting an LCA is to compare the full range of environmental impacts that emanate from the provision of these products or services and then use that information to improve the situation to minimize or eliminate harm. The focus of this class will be to understand the phases of an LCA as well as conduct LCAs that compare the impacts of two related options. This course will enable the student to conduct LCAs and examine the use of software that could be used in this regard.The classic examples are cloth vs. disposable diapers, paper vs. ceramic cups, and so on. This course will enable the student to conduct LCAs and examine the use of software that could be used in this regard. Prerequisite: If course requirement not met, permissionof instructor required. Course Online: Synchronous Format
ENVS 681-660 Modeling Geograph Space Jill Kelly W 05:15 PM-08:15 PM This course explores the nature and use of raster-based geographic information systems (GIS) for the analysis and synthesis of spatial patterns and processes through 'cartographic modeling'. Cartographic modeling is a general but well defined methodology that can be used to address a wide variety of analytical mapping applications in a clear and consistent manner. It does so by decomposing both data and data-processing tasks into elemental components that can then be recomposed with relative ease and with great flexibility. Undergraduates Need Permission
Course Online: Synchronous Format
ENVS 682-660 Leading Change For Sustainability Kim Quick DRLB 2N36 M 05:15 PM-08:15 PM Sustainability presents both a challenge and an opportunity for society. Issues like climate change, pollution, resource depletion, and population imbalance are stressing the planet's capacity in ways that threaten our ability to sustain thriving and just societies. At the same time, these systemic problems are unfolding too slowly to prompt most of us to take serious and significant action, or to trigger meaningful responses from our political and business leaders. People equate sustainability with efficiency, waste minimization, and pollution prevention - all worthy goals - but at the current rate of consumption and growth these approaches alone will not create the future of abundance and equity that we desire. To quote author and MIT professor John Ehrenfeld, "Reducing unsustainability - although critical - will not create sustainability." What will it take to extricate us from the current predicament and forge a new path? In this class, we will examine underlying psychological and cultural barriers to sustainability and discuss strategies for surmounting them. Students will learn leadership competencies and practices to help them more effectively lead change efforts for sustainability. Readings and discussions will explore the application of positive psychology to leverage the human technologies of creativity and collaboration in the pursuit of a more balanced and sustainable relationship with others and our ecosystems, and to shift the sustainability dialogue from the current problem-oriented approach to a vision of human wellbeing and planetary flourishing.
ENVS 684-660 Ecology, Management, and Advocacy of Urban Forests Sarah A Willig HAYD 358 W 05:15 PM-08:15 PM Urban forests provide ecological and socio-economic benefits ranging from improving air, water, and soil quality to creating wildlife habitat to enhancing thermal comfort and the health of individuals and whole communities to increasing property values and more. We will explore research on the nature, function, and value of urban forests. We will investigate reforestation efforts in Philadelphia, Baltimore, New York, and Pittsburgh with projects typically involving deer control, invasive plant removal, planting of native trees and shrubs increasingly propagated from local seed sources, maintenance, and monitoring. We will learn about the myriad advocacy and education programs supporting urban forests. Speakers from the US Forest Service, Philadelphia Parks and Recreation, and TreePittsburgh will expand our understanding of these important ecosystems. Five weekend field trips to Fairmount Park in Philadelphia, Baltimore, and NYC will illustrate the character of urban forests and reforestation projects. Students will research and present on an urban forest system (from Philadelphia or elsewhere) and research a topic of interest related to course content. Undergraduates Need Permission
ENVS 699-660 Mes Capstone Seminar Maria-Antonia Andrews
Yvette L Bordeaux
PCPE 200 T 05:15 PM-08:15 PM This course is designed to help students successfully complete their MES Capstone. A set of milestones will be set and regular meetings will be held in groups and individually to aid the student as they complete the research portion of their degree.We will be working together to complete a series of steps towards the final project. These steps fall into five major areas 1) Reviewing the literature; 2) Finding a model; 3) Framing your research; 4) managing data; and 5) Writing your results. Throughout the semester, we will also discuss career goals and the job search. Prerequisite: Project proposal and Online Application equired for course regisration. See MES Office and "Guide to the Capatone" for more information.
GEOL 103-601 Natural Disturbances and Disasters Siobhan Whadcoat
Regan Wilson
DRLB 3W2 M 05:15 PM-08:15 PM Natural disasters play a fundamental role in shaping landscapes and structuring ecosystems. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to both the natural and social science of disasters. This course will explore the geologic processes that cause natural disasters, the ecological and social consequences of disasters, and the role of human behavior in disaster management and mitigation. Through exploring these concepts, this class will provide you with a broad background in the geosciences and the basic tools needed to understand: how earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, and hurricanes occur; the myriad of ways that we can mitigate against their impacts; and the way in which we can "calculate the cost" of these disasters. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Natural Science & Math Sector https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=GEOL103601
GEOL 125-001 Earth Through Time Ilya V. Buynevich STIT B6 TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Origin of Earth, continents, and life. Continental movements, changing climates, and evolving life. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req.
Physical World Sector
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
GEOL 125-201 Earth and Life Through Time Ilya V. Buynevich HAYD 358 M 10:15 AM-11:15 AM Origin of Earth, continents, and life. Continental movements, changing climates, and evolving life. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
GEOL 125-202 Earth and Life Through Time Ilya V. Buynevich HAYD 360 T 03:30 PM-04:30 PM Origin of Earth, continents, and life. Continental movements, changing climates, and evolving life. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
GEOL 125-203 Earth and Life Through Time Ilya V. Buynevich HAYD 358 W 03:30 PM-04:30 PM Origin of Earth, continents, and life. Continental movements, changing climates, and evolving life. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
GEOL 125-204 Earth and Life Through Time Ilya V. Buynevich HAYD 360 F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM Origin of Earth, continents, and life. Continental movements, changing climates, and evolving life. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
GEOL 130-001 Oceanography: Oceans & Climate Ilya V. Buynevich STIT B6 TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM The oceans cover over 2/3 of the Earth's surface. This course introduces basic oceanographic concepts such as plate tectonics, marine sediments, physical and chemical properties of seawater, ocean circulation, air-sea interactions, waves, tides, nutrient cycles in the ocean, biology of the oceans, and environmental issues related to the marine environment. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req.
Physical World Sector
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
GEOL 130-201 Oceanography Ilya V. Buynevich HAYD 358 M 01:45 PM-02:45 PM The oceans cover over 2/3 of the Earth's surface. This course introduces basic oceanographic concepts such as plate tectonics, marine sediments, physical and chemical properties of seawater, ocean circulation, air-sea interactions, waves, tides, nutrient cycles in the ocean, biology of the oceans, and environmental issues related to the marine environment. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
GEOL 130-202 Oceanography Ilya V. Buynevich HAYD 358 M 03:30 PM-04:30 PM The oceans cover over 2/3 of the Earth's surface. This course introduces basic oceanographic concepts such as plate tectonics, marine sediments, physical and chemical properties of seawater, ocean circulation, air-sea interactions, waves, tides, nutrient cycles in the ocean, biology of the oceans, and environmental issues related to the marine environment. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
GEOL 130-203 Oceanography Ilya V. Buynevich HAYD 358 W 10:15 AM-11:15 AM The oceans cover over 2/3 of the Earth's surface. This course introduces basic oceanographic concepts such as plate tectonics, marine sediments, physical and chemical properties of seawater, ocean circulation, air-sea interactions, waves, tides, nutrient cycles in the ocean, biology of the oceans, and environmental issues related to the marine environment. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
GEOL 130-204 Oceanography Ilya V. Buynevich DRLB 4C4 W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The oceans cover over 2/3 of the Earth's surface. This course introduces basic oceanographic concepts such as plate tectonics, marine sediments, physical and chemical properties of seawater, ocean circulation, air-sea interactions, waves, tides, nutrient cycles in the ocean, biology of the oceans, and environmental issues related to the marine environment. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
GEOL 130-205 Oceanography Ilya V. Buynevich HAYD 358 W 01:45 PM-02:45 PM The oceans cover over 2/3 of the Earth's surface. This course introduces basic oceanographic concepts such as plate tectonics, marine sediments, physical and chemical properties of seawater, ocean circulation, air-sea interactions, waves, tides, nutrient cycles in the ocean, biology of the oceans, and environmental issues related to the marine environment. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
GEOL 130-206 Oceanography Ilya V. Buynevich DRLB 3C8 W 03:30 PM-04:30 PM The oceans cover over 2/3 of the Earth's surface. This course introduces basic oceanographic concepts such as plate tectonics, marine sediments, physical and chemical properties of seawater, ocean circulation, air-sea interactions, waves, tides, nutrient cycles in the ocean, biology of the oceans, and environmental issues related to the marine environment. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
GEOL 130-207 Oceanography Ilya V. Buynevich HAYD 358 F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM The oceans cover over 2/3 of the Earth's surface. This course introduces basic oceanographic concepts such as plate tectonics, marine sediments, physical and chemical properties of seawater, ocean circulation, air-sea interactions, waves, tides, nutrient cycles in the ocean, biology of the oceans, and environmental issues related to the marine environment. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
GEOL 130-208 Oceanography Ilya V. Buynevich HAYD 358 F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The oceans cover over 2/3 of the Earth's surface. This course introduces basic oceanographic concepts such as plate tectonics, marine sediments, physical and chemical properties of seawater, ocean circulation, air-sea interactions, waves, tides, nutrient cycles in the ocean, biology of the oceans, and environmental issues related to the marine environment. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
GEOL 305-401 Earth Surface Processes Douglas J. Jerolmack CANCELED Patterns on the Earth's surface arise due to the transport of sediment by water and wind, with energy that is supplied by climate and tectonic deformation of the solid Earth. This course presents a treatment of the processes of erosion and deposition that shape landscapes. Emphasis will be placed on using simple physical principles as a tool for (a) understanding landscape patterns including drainage networks, river channels and deltas, desert dunes, and submarine channels, (b) reconstructing past environmental conditions using the sedimentary record, and (c) the management of rivers and landscapes under present and future climate scenarios. The course will conclude with a critical assessment of landscape evolution on other planets, including Mars.
GEOL 317-001 Petrol & Petrog Reto Giere HAYD 360 W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Occurrences and origins of igneous and metamorphic rocks; phase equilibria in heterogeneous systems. Laboratory study of rocks and thin sections as a tool in interpretation of petrogenesis. Two field trips.
GEOL 399-401 Junior Research Seminar Maria-Antonia Andrews HAYD 358 T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This seminar is designed to help Juniors prepare for the Senior Thesis research. Topic selection, advisor identification, funding options, and basic research methods will be discussed. ENVS399401
GEOL 400-301 Topics in Earth Science: Environmental Fluid Dynamics HAYD 360 MWF 08:30 AM-09:30 AM In depth examination of special topics in Earth Science. Topics will change with instructor and course offerings.
GEOL 479-001 Macroevolution Lauren C Sallan COLL 315A TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Macroevolution, or evolution above the population level and on long time scales, as a field addresses fundamental questions about the origins of life, past and present. These include but are not limited to: How are highly dissimilar species related? Why are animals on distant continents so similar? How and when did major groups, like birds or mammals, originate? What drives evolutionary arms races? Why are there so many more species of beetle than crocodile? Why are there more species in the tropics than the arctic? Did dinosaurs prevent the diversification of mammals? Why do some animals survive mass extinction? How can invasive species spread so rapidly? Students will learn important concepts underlying our understanding of modern biodiversity and the fossil record, as well as how to use different methods and lines of evidence, including evolutionary trees (phylogeny), fossil databases, past climate and global events, mathematical modeling, and even modern genomics, to answer fundamental questions about the evolution of life.
GEOL 498-001 Senior Thesis David Goldsby HAYD 360 W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: GEOL 400-level and declaration of the EASC major. The Earth Science major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of GEOL 399 and two semesters of GEOL 498. Permission Needed From Department
See Dept. For Section Numbers
GEOL 498-140 Senior Thesis: An Examination of Airborne Microplastics in Philadelphia David Goldsby W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: GEOL 400-level and declaration of the EASC major. The Earth Science major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of GEOL 399 and two semesters of GEOL 498. Permission Needed From Department
GEOL 498-141 Senior Thesis: Grain Boundary Sliding in Ice Bi-Crystals David Goldsby W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: GEOL 400-level and declaration of the EASC major. The Earth Science major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of GEOL 399 and two semesters of GEOL 498. Permission Needed From Department
GEOL 498-142 Senior Thesis: Effect of Retention of Trace Atmospheric Gases in Clouds On Climate Change David Goldsby W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: GEOL 400-level and declaration of the EASC major. The Earth Science major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of GEOL 399 and two semesters of GEOL 498. Permission Needed From Department
GEOL 498-143 Senior Thesis: Determining C3/C4 Latitudinal Shifts with Remote Sensing & Machine Learning Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: GEOL 400-level and declaration of the EASC major. The Earth Science major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of GEOL 399 and two semesters of GEOL 498. Permission Needed From Department
GEOL 498-144 Senior Thesis: Developing A Holistic Framework To Evaluate Local Carbon Offset Projects Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: GEOL 400-level and declaration of the EASC major. The Earth Science major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of GEOL 399 and two semesters of GEOL 498. Permission Needed From Department
GEOL 498-145 Senior Thesis: Using Psychological Distance To Change Environmental Attitudes Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: GEOL 400-level and declaration of the EASC major. The Earth Science major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of GEOL 399 and two semesters of GEOL 498. Permission Needed From Department
GEOL 498-146 Senior Thesis: Documenting Coastal Forest Retreat and Marsh Migration On the Coast of Nj Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: GEOL 400-level and declaration of the EASC major. The Earth Science major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of GEOL 399 and two semesters of GEOL 498. Permission Needed From Department
GEOL 498-147 Senior Thesis: A Spatial Analysis of Climate Impacts On Biodiversity and Indigenous People Jane E Dmochowski W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis. Prerequisite: GEOL 400-level and declaration of the EASC major. The Earth Science major, as of the fall of 2008, requires 1 semester of GEOL 399 and two semesters of GEOL 498. Permission Needed From Department
GEOL 545-401 Adv Earth Surf Processes CANCELED Pattern on the Earth's surface arise due to the transport of sediment by water and wind, with energy that is supplied by climate and tectonic deformation of the solid Earth. This course presents a treatment of the processes of erosion and deposition that shape landscapes. Emphasis will be placed on using simple physical principles as a tool for (a) understanding landscape patterns including drainage networks, river channels and deltas, desert dunes, and submarine channels, (b) reconstructing past environmental conditions using the sedimentary record, and (c) the management of rivers and landscapes under present and future climate scenarios. The course will conclude with a critical assessment of landscape evolution on other planets, including Mars.
GEOL 643-690 Sustainable Development of Water Resource Systems J. Anthony Sauder DRLB 2C2 W 05:15 PM-08:15 PM The evaluation of technical, social and economic constraints on the design of water supply and sanitation projects. The focus on sustainable design emphasizes how technical solutions fit within the appropriate social context. Case studies are used to demonstrate these principles across a range of examples from developed and developing countries including detailed studies from rural communities with limited resources. CBE543690 Undergraduates Need Permission
GEOL 644-690 Contaminated Site Investigation, Remediation, and Long-Term Stewardship Mitch A Cron DRLB 4N30 R 05:15 PM-08:15 PM The superfund law authorizes the president to respond to releases of hazardous substances into the environment in order to protect public health and the environment. This course will focus on topics related to such responses, including environmental investigation and risk assessment, environmental remediation techniques, and related topics.
GEOL 661-690 Environmental Groundwater Hydrology Carl Mastropaolo DRLB 3C4 M 05:15 PM-08:15 PM This course is designed to introduce the major definitions and concepts regarding groundwater flow and contaminant transport. The theory and underlying concepts, including mathematical derivations of governing equations used to model groundwater flow and contaminant transport, will be discussed and applications to environmental problems addressed. Upon completion of this course, students should expect to have acquired the skills necessary to pursue course work in flow and transport numerical and analytical modeling.
GEOL 668-690 Geomechanics: Fluids George E Duda HAYD 360 T 05:15 PM-08:15 PM Static and Dynamic mechanical properties of fluid in earth materials, as applied to the Hydrologic Sciences; Principles of Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics applied to open channel flow in earth materials; flow through gates, weirs, spillways, and culverts; Applications of Darcy's Law to subsurface flow and seepage.
GEOL 672-690 Landslides Siobhan Whadcoat CANCELED Landslides are important geomorphic agents in mountainous terrain, mobilizing sediment and playing a key role in controlling relief and elevation. The work of landslides is often characterized by their magnitude-frequency, which also has direct implications for people, property, and infrastructure in mountainous terrain, and for the approaches taken to minimize the risk from landslides. This course will introduce students to a conceptual understanding of landslides at a range of spatial scales, including the mechanics of the processes governing landslides from trigger to deposition. Methods of slope monitoring and the varied approaches to landslide risk mitigation and management will be explored, with a range of geotechnical and environmental applications. This course includes lab-based sessions to demonstrate simple techniques to understand fundamental landslide processes, and applications of GIS technology to explore slope monitoring and failure prediction. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=GEOL672690
GEOL 680-690 Interpretation of Near-Surface Geologic Structure For Eng and Env Pros Chad H Freed CANCELED The course introduces the basic principles of structural geology and their applications to engineering and environmental site characterization. Includes the mechanisms for the deformation and failure of the earth's crust, folded and faulted structures, and the orthogonal and stereographic solutions to characterize near-surface geologic structure. It also includes the construction and interpretation of geologic maps, geologic cross sections and block diagrams. Emphasis is placed on the graphical representation of subsurface data, including the use of selected computer programs, and the integration of the data to solve problems encountered in engineering and environmental projects.
GEOL 699-690 Project Design Maria-Antonia Andrews
Yvette L Bordeaux
PCPE 200 T 05:15 PM-08:15 PM This course is designed to prepare Master of Science in Applied Geosciences students to undertake their Project Design exercise. In this course, we discuss how to identify an appropriate research project, how to design a research plan, and how to prepare a detailed proposal. By the end of the course, each student is expected to have completed a Project Design proposal.
GEOL 750-301 Professional Development Joseph S Francisco HAYD 256 R 05:15 PM-08:15 PM This course will use the weekly EES seminar series to survey historic breakthrogh papers or topics in the earth sciences, as well as modern papers - written by the seminar speakers - that often put the classics in perspective. Graduate students (Ph.D. only) in the Department of Earth and Environmental Science will engage in the material through reading, presentation, and discussion. The course has several goals. (1.) To engender an understanding and appreciation of major breakthroughs in our field. (2.) To develop skills in presenting and discussing scientific results. And (3.) to refine students' understanding of what constitutes great science.
GEOL 750-302 Topics in Earth Science David Goldsby HAYD 256 R 01:00 PM-04:00 PM This course will use the weekly EES seminar series to survey historic breakthrogh papers or topics in the earth sciences, as well as modern papers - written by the seminar speakers - that often put the classics in perspective. Graduate students (Ph.D. only) in the Department of Earth and Environmental Science will engage in the material through reading, presentation, and discussion. The course has several goals. (1.) To engender an understanding and appreciation of major breakthroughs in our field. (2.) To develop skills in presenting and discussing scientific results. And (3.) to refine students' understanding of what constitutes great science.